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JOSIAH BABCOCK is buried in the Hope cemetery in Galesburg (1823 to 1897) with his wife Catherine S. Wheeler (1857 to 1890) and his son William W. (1857 to 1944) and his son Josiah W. Junior (1860 to 1944) and his wife Grace Chapman (1864 to 1938) and two of Josiah Junior's children.

According to the 1860 census, Josiah was born in New Hampshire and his wife was born in Maine with their children being born in Illinois. He was a merchant according to the 1860 census.

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From the 1899 Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and Knox County, Munsell Publishing Company.

JOSIAH BABCOCK, son of Josiah and Sarah (Pettingill) Babcock, was born in Andover NH, August 22, 1823. His paternal grandfather, who had the same name, was born in Milton MA, July 6, 1752. His maternal grandfather was Amos Pettingill; the time and place of his birth are unknown. His father, who was also named Josiah, was born in Andover NH, September 21, 1791, and his mother, Sarah Pettingill, was born in Salisbury NH, September 21, 1797.

Josiah Babcock, the third of the same name in the line, was not reared in affluence. His early years were spent among the stern and rugged hills of his native state. His education was obtained in the common schools and in Hampden Academy, Maine. He was not broadly educated, but was thoroughly trained in those branches necessary to a practical business life. In his boyhood days he worked in the lumber camps on the Penobscot river in Maine. When only eighteen years of age, he ran a saw mill for his father. He continued in this work for five years, when he came West, reaching Peoria IL, in 1846. Here he was engaged in a wholesale house of general merchandise for Moses Pettingill. After two years of service, he bought an interest in the firm and became a junior partner. He conducted this business successfully for several years , when he sold out and came to Galesburg in 1852. His first partnership here was with Warren Willard in a store of general merchandise. He soon sold out and engaged in the hardware business with Reed and Stilson under the firm name of Reed, Babcock, and Stilson.

Mr. Babcock continued in this business, almost uninterruptedly, until the day of his death, which occurred September 1, 1897, at the age of seventy-three. He first bought Reed's and Stilson's interest and then ran the business in his own name. He then sold out to Calkins and Wilcox, which firm existed but a short time. He next took Mr. Reed as a partner under the firm name of Reed and Babcock. This co-partnership lasted until Mr. Reed's death, and then it was changed to Babcock and Pierpont. This last co-partnership continued until the retirement of Mr. Pierpont in 1893. Then Mr. Babcock continued in the business in his own name.

Mr. Babcock was prosperous in every relation of life. He started almost alone in the world and became a man of wealth. He possessed ability and was always noted for his honesty of purpose. He had no high aspiration for the honors of office, but was contented with the simplicity of home life and with the duties devolving upon him as a citizen. He took the position in the ranks of toilers working in the interest of the city, and earned the reputation of a man whose word is law and whose acts are just and right. His views were broad, charitable, and intelligent; and his life was a blessing to the community in which he lived.

Mr. Babcock always took an active interest in the prosperity and welfare of the city of his adoption. Every line of business and every project which his judgment approved received his cordial support. He encouraged the establishment of the Electric Power and Motor Company, and was a part owner and director. For thirty years, he was a director in the Second National Bank of Galesburg, and for many years its Vice President. He was always regarded as one of its most trustworthy guardians and managers.

He was a friend of education. He believed not only in the common school system but in higher institutions of learning. He was a staunch supporter of Knox College, and for many years was one of its trustees. His discretion and judgment, as a member of its Executive Committee, were appreciated and acknowledged.

Politically, Mr. Babcock was a republican, but in no sense a partisan. No man ever exercised the right of suffrage in a freer spirit than he. He voted for measures, not men. In religious faith, he was a Congregationalist and a deacon in the church for many years.

He was wedded in Hampton, Maine, November 7, 1853, to Catherine Wheeler, daughter of Willard Wheeler, who was once a sea captain. To them were born three children, Alice, wife of W. J. Pierpont, living in Crescent City, Florida; William W., and Josiah, who is engaged in the hardware business in the store building formerly occupied by his father.


From the 1886 Portrait and Biographical Album of Knox County, Biographical Publishing Company, Chicago.  [Contributed by Bob Miller.]

REV. CHARLES A. BACKMAN.  Page 778.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

DeWITT CLINTON BACON, M.D.  He was born in Oneida County, NY, on 23 April 1826.  He is the son of Abner and Martha (Blackman) Bacon, the former of Dedham, MA, and the latter of NY.  He was educated in the common and select schools, and in the Baptist Seminary at Clinton, NY.  When not in school he labored in his father's shops or mills or on his farm in horticultural pursuits.  He spent a year in Mississippi teaching and hunting.  On his return he went to learn dentistry, which led to the study of medicine.  He attended lectures at Geneva Medical College, then went to the College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York City, where he graduated in 1849.  He came to Oneida, Illinois, in 1855.  He married Louisa S. Knight in 1855 [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a Dr. M. C. Bacon marrying a Louisa S. Knight in Knox County on September 11, 1855].  Two sons and three daughters are the fruit of their union.  Mrs. B. died 26 Feb 1871.  Dr. B. moved his office to Galesburg in 1877.


From the 1899 Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and Knox County, Munsell Publishing Company, page 850.  [Contributed by Barbara.]

Eli F. BAER; Farmer; Henderson Township; born January 11, 1863, in Henry County, Illinois; educated in Westfield College, Illinois.  His parents who were natives of Franklin County, Pennsylvania were: David F. Baer, born May 11, 1827, and died, July 18, 1890, and Susanna (Rine) Baer, born April 28, 1825; his grandparents were David and Elizabeth (Flicklinger) Baer of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania; his maternal grandparents were Michael Rine of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania and Elizabeth (Dunkle) Rine, of Hagerstown, Maryland; his great-grandparents were Michael Dunkle and Susanna Raider.  Mr. Baer was married to Angie Waters, at Gilson, Illinois, May 25, 1898 [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a Eli F. Baer marrying a Mrs. Angie Walters in Knox County on May 25, 1898].  Mr. Baer is a prohibitionist.  In religion, he belongs to the United Brethren in Christ.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

LEVI G. BAIR.  He is a merchant, son of David and Mary Ann Bair of Franklin County, Pennsylvania, and was born at Chambersburg, Pennsylvania on Mar. 10, 1842.  He received his education in the subscription school of Franklin County, PA.  He came to Illinois in 1851, settling in Knox County in 1860.  He married Amanda Mann on Nov. 15, 1866 [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a Levi G. Bair marrying a Amanda Mann in Mercer County on November 15, 1866].  Three children were born to them.  He was married again on April 5, 1874 to Martha S. Deatherage [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a Levi G. Bair marrying a Martha Deatherage in Knox County on April 4, 1874].  A Democrat in politics.  He was seven years Collector in Rio, Town Clerk two years and at present is Supervisor.  Post Office, Rio.


From the 1886 Portrait and Biographical Album - Knox County, Illinois, published by the Biographical Publishing Company

Walter Bailey Among the successful farmers of Elba Township is the gentelman whose name heads this notice, and who resides on his fine farm on section 26. He came to this county in October, 1849, from Delaware County, Ohio, and some few years later purchased the 160 acres of land where his is at present residing. He has subsequently increased his landed interest, and at this writing, is the owner of 860 acres, 80 of which are timber. On his fine place he erected a good residence in 1871, barn and other necessary out-buildings, and the farm is indicative of that push and energy characteristic of its proprietor. Mr. Bailey was born in St. Lawrence County, New York, 9 January 1827, and is the son of James and Eve (Kitts) Bailey. They were natives of St. Lawrence County, New York. James Bailey was a farmer, surveyor, and mechanic, and was engaged in various other occupations, but farming was his chief business in life. When he was ten years of age his parents removed to Ohio and there lived until they came to Galva, in Henry County, where the good mother and loving wife, passed away, 11 September 1873. The father afterward returned to Delaware County, Ohio, where his demise occurred in June 1875. Walter, however, came direct to Knox County from Ohio.
Walter Bailey was married in Elmwood Township, Peoria County, this State on 14 February 1855, to Harriet L. Parsell, daughter of Joseph and Hetty A. (Ralston) Parsell. Her parents came to Fulton County, Illinois, from Hamilton County, Ohio, and lived in the former county for about one year. In 1840 they moved to Elmwood Township, Peoria County, where the mother died on 17 April 1850. The father was again, married, and in 1864 removed to the village of Elmwood, that county, where he lived for 11 years, and until 1875, when he came to Elba Township, and lived with his daughter, Mrs. Bailey, of this notice, until 3 January 1880, the date of his demise.
Mrs. Bailey was born in Sycamore Township, Hamilton County, Ohio on 30 July 1835 and has borne her husband five children, named, Edith A., Lura D., Bertha B., Addie G. and Nena H. Edith is the wife of W.D. Ware, a resident of Summit, Illinois, and to them three children have been born - Catherine S., Winfield B. and Edna D.; Lura married George F. Hughes, who lives at Table Grove, Fulton County, Illinois. The remaining children remain at home. Mr. Bailey has held the office of Justice of Peace four years, and also various school offices within the gift of the people of the people of his township. In politics he is a stanch and active Republican. When Mr. B. came here, his land was uncultivated and the improvements now to be seen are due to his own thrift and energy. He had but little means, and what he now possesses had been the accumulation of his own toil and economy.


From the 1888 Portrait and Biographical Album of Lancaster County, Nebraska, Chapman Brothers.  [Contributed by Todd Walter.]

OLIVER S. BAIRD, of the firm of Baird Bros., dealers in hardware and tinware at No. 1242 O street,  is an intelligent, wide-awake man, whose fine business talents are gaining him an assured place among the leading merchants of Lincoln.  He was born in Clinton County, Pa., Nov. 22, 1840, and is a son of James H. and Catherine (Stout) Baird, natives respectively of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, his father born in 1804, and his mother in 1814.  His father was early in life a lumberman in Pennsylvania.  In 1841 he migrated to Knox County, Ill., and purchased 320 acres of land, and was extensively engaged in farming there until his death in 1866, when a valuable citizen was lost to the community where he resided.  He was not a member of the church, but, his life was characterized by strict honesty and uprightness, his word always being regarded as good as a bond, and by industrious labor he had accumulated a comfortable property.  In politics he was a strong Republican.  His good wife survived him several years, dying on the old homestead in Knox County, in 1882.  She was a woman of singularly pure and good character, and, although a member of no church, was, nevertheless, a sincere Christian.

Our subject was reared on his father's farm in Elba Township, Knox Co., Ill., and received the preliminaries of his education in the common schools.  He had not attained his majority when the war broke out, but on the 22d of September, 1861, he enlisted in the service as a private in Company B, 8th Missouri  Infantry, being mustered in at St. Louis.  Thence his regiment was ordered to Paducah, Ky., and took an active part in the capture of Fts. Henry and Donelson.  Our subject served under both Grant and Sherman; he was in the battle of Corinth, and in the first attempt to take Vicksburg.  He was at Arkansas Post, and also assisted his comrades in the victorious battle at Champion Hills.  He was present at the siege of Vicksburg, which commenced May 19, and ended on the 4th of July, 1863.  Our subject was sick after that and went home on a furlough of six weeks, and at the expiration of that time rejoined his regiment at Iuka, Miss., his fine constitution having quickly recuperated from the effects of the wound that he received at Vicksburg.  After his return to the South, Mr. Baird participated in the battle of Chattanooga, and when the order was. given to take the rifle-pits at the foot of Missionary Ridge, he was one of that company of brave and daring men who, carrying the works at the base, and entirely forgetful of previous orders to halt and re-form, dashed on up the ascent, surmounted every obstacle, unheeding the bullets of the enemy, advanced  over the crest, and an instant later turned the captured rebel guns on the retreating foe, and the battle of Chattanooga was won.  He was subsequently detailed to do duty in the commissary department, where he was employed until his honorable discharge, Sept. 22, 1864, at East Point, Ga.

After his retirement from the army Mr. Baird returned to his old home in Knox County, Ill., and for six months he worked out by the month.  But being ambitious to finish his education, he entered a commercial college at Chicago, where for two years, 1866 and 1867, he pursued a thorough coursed study, which well qualified him, for any business that he might adopt in after life.  After leaving school he opened a grocery store in Yates City, but he afterward sold out and established himself in the dry-goods business at Gilson.

He next entered into the grain and stock business there, and later carried on the same in Knoxville very successfully until 1879, when he went to Maquon, Knox County, and became a hardware merchant.  In 1883 Mr. Baird left the Prairie State to make his home in Lincoln, being attracted hither by the enterprise and push of the citizens of this city, who were making it a great commercial center and providing innumerable chances for a live man to establish himself in a good business, and, at least, make a competency, if he did not become wealthy.  The success that has followed his efforts since he came has proved the wisdom of his choice of location.  He and his brother, who is also a man of much ability, have leased the present building that they occupy for seven years; they carry about $8,000 worth of stock, have a fine assortment of first-class hardware, and have built up a large trade.

Mr. Baird was married, May 25, 1872, to Miss Sarah A. Pickerel [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a Oliver L. Baird marrying a Sarah A. Pickrel in Knox County on May 25, 1871], who was born in Knox County, in 1850, coming of an old pioneer family of Illinois, who went there from Virginia in 1838.  She was a woman of many graces of mind and heart, that made her beloved by all who came under her influence, and in her death, June 10, 1883, many friends mourned their loss.  She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and was active in all its good works.

Mr. Baird has ever proved a good citizen, from the time when, as a mere youth, he went forth to fight his country's battles, and on Southern battlefields gained a good record as a brave and fearless soldier, to the present time, when he is doing all that he can to promote the material welfare of his adopted State.  In politics he is a sound Republican; socially, he is a prominent member of the G. A. R., as represented in this city by Farragut Post No. 25.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

MORVAN BAKER.  He is a farmer, and came from New York, where he was born in Washington County on July 30, 1819.  He came to Knox County in 1839.  His parents were Newton and Ann (Spaulding) Baker, natives of New York.  Morvan was reared on a farm and had but little schooling.  He worked at coopering for many years.  He has been School Director, Treasurer, Trustee and Justice of the Peace.  He was married to Alida Lansing on Sept. 2, 1840 [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a Morvin Baker marrying a Alida Lonsing in Knox County on September 2, 1840].  They have had ten children, eight of whom now live.  He was united with the Christian Church in 1837.  Republican.  Post Office, Abingdon.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

ADDISON NEWTON BANCROFT.  He is a grocer and is the son of William and Sallie (Briggs) Bancroft of Worcester County, MA, where he was born on June 4, 1820.  He spent his childhood on a farm.  At the age of 16 he learned the trade of brick mason, which he followed for twenty years.  In 1838, he went to Steuben County NY, where he remained until 1842, and then went to Iowa, living there until 1849.  He then came to Galesburg.  He married Catharine Blair on March 15, 1849.  They had seven children, only three of whom are living.  He has been a member of the Congregational Church for more than forty years, and has been an Elder of the First Church for fifteen years.  He has been in the grocery business since 1858.  He is a Republican in politics.  Mr. B.'s oldest son, Edward A., a graduate of Knox College in the class of 1878 won the prize for oratory in the Inter-State Collegiate contest at St. Louis in June, 1878.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

RICHARD BANDY.  He is a farmer, son of Reuben and Libby (Adkasin) Bandy, both of Virginia.  He was born in Tazewell County, IL, on Mar. 14, 1833.  He was educated in the common schools of the county.  His parents came to Knox County in 1837.  He was married to Lucinda Nelson on Jan. 15, 1857 [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a Richard Bandy marrying a Lucinda E. Nelson in Henry County on January 15, 1857].  He has held the offices of School Director and Road Commissioner for may years.  He is a Republican and a successful farmer.  P. O. Galesburg.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

J. G. BARBER.  A farmer, he is the son of James and Mary (McForlard) Barber, the former a native of Maryland and the latter of Ohio.  He was born on Oct. 7, 1848.  He was educated in the common schools and early life passed in learning a trade.  He followed the business of engineering and saqwing which proved satisfactory to him, but finally changed it to farming.  He moved from Ohio to Knox County Nov. 28, 1868.  He married Mary Ellen Fields.  They are the parents of four children.  He has been quite successful as a farmer and is now in moderate circumstances.  In politics, a Democrat.  P.O. Knoxville.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

NATHAN BARBERO.  He is a son of John and Sarah (Van Patten) Barbero, natives of New York.  He was born in Montgomery County, NY, on April 13, 1805.  He had a little schooling in the district school before 10 years old, and was reared on the farm.  He learned the trade of carpenter and built many carding machines at Maquon.  He drove a team in the War of 1812.  He came to Knox County in 1839.  He married Calista W. Loomis in March of 1832.  They are the parents of four children.  Mr. B. drove from New York once with 1,500 pounds on wagon in twenty-two days.  He is a member of the Christian Church.  Republican, residence Maquon.

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From the 1886 Portrait and Biographical Album of Knox County, Biographical Publishing Company, Chicago, page 262.  [Contributed by Caryn Barbero-Just.]

NATHAN BARBERO, deceased, came to Knox County in the fall of 1839, with his wife and three children, from Oneida County, N.Y., and made settlement in the village of Maquon.  In 1872, Mr. Barbero left the village and moved to Haw Creek Township, where he was a sturdy tiller of the soil until his demise, which took place Jan. 1, 1885.  He was a farmer and engaged quite extensively in agricultural pursuits, and at the date of his death was the proprietor of 1,000 acres of land.

Mr. Barbero was born in Montgomery County, N.Y., April 13, 1805.  His life was spent in York State until he came to Illinois, and he was married in Oneida County, the former State, March 1, 1832, to Calista W. Loomis.  She was born in Oneida County, N.Y., Aug. 9, 1809, and bore him four children - Anna M., Sarah L., Nathan H., and John J.  Anna M. is the widow of Alexander O. Donason, and resides in Maquon Township.  (See sketch:)  Sarah L. is the wife of M. McGirr.  (See sketch:)  Nathan H. married Eliza Bird and resides in Haw Creek Township; John J. married Clara Will and is a farmer of Haw Creek Township.  Mrs. Barbero was formerly a member of the Christian Church.  Her parents were Jeremiah E. and Sallie (Higbee) Loomis, he of Irish and Welsh extraction, and she of English ancestry.  Mrs. Barbero was the second in order of birth of a family of six children, viz.: Sally, Nathaniel S., Lucinda, Lorinda and Celestia.  Sally became the wife of John Ennis, who in turn became the parents of 11 children, five of whom are now living; Nathaniel S. married Betsy Ennis, by the union four children were born to them.  He is now deceased; Lucinda married Leonard Rogers, but is now dead; Lorinda married Lot Webster, and both are numbered with the departed, and Celestia, who died when young.

Mr. Barbero was the fifth child in order of birth of a family of nine children, viz.: Margaret, Nellie, Matthais, John, Aaron, Nathan (our subject), Frederick and Rebecca.  Margaret became the wife of Abraham Van Horn; Nellie married Geo. Castler; Matthais married Catherine Fink; Aaron left home at the age of 28 or 29, and was never heard from; John is now deceased; Frederick married Malinda Bartell; and Rebecca became the wife of Harry Libolt.  Mr. Barbero's father was born in Connecticut and the mother in New York, and his parents were John and Sallie (Van Pattent) Barbero.  They were of German and Holland extraction.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

JOHN F. BARKER.  Photographer, as the son of Amos and Sophia Barker, both of Connecticut, was born in Nunda, NY, Nov. 14, 1831.  He received his education in the district schools of Nunda and by study and observation since.  Most of his early life was spent on a farm.  He learned photography.  He was Assistant Postmaster in Belfact ,NY, and was Commissary Sergeant and military detective in the late war.  He went from NY to Whitewater, Wis.; went back to Nunda, and thence to Galesburg.  He has been a member of the M. E. Church since 1856, is Steward and Trustee.  Is a Republican.


From the 1886 Portrait and Biographical Album of Knox County, Biographical Publishing Company, Chicago, page 596.  [Contributed by Pat Thomas.]

Samuel K. Barlow, a successful farmer, residing on section 13, Lynn Township, where he owns a good farm of 128 acres of rich and productive land, was born in Lynn Township, April 13, 1846.  Mr. Barlow, in addition to the raising of the cereals, is engaged to no inconsiderable extent in stock breeding, and in the latter department of his vocation is meeting with excellent success.

The father of our subject, Nathan Barlow, deceased, was an early settler in this county, and experienced all the trials incident to the establishment of a home and the cultivation of a farm in a new and sparsely-settled country.  Samuel Barlow was educated in the public schools and lived at home, assisting in the cultivation of the farm, until his marriage.  That event occurred at the residence of the bride's parents Nov. 27, 1865, in Lynn Township, and the lady of his choice was Miss Lavina E. Gross [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a Samuel K. Barlow marrying a Lavinia E. Gross in Knox County on November 27, 1864], daughter of Freeman Gross, whose biography is given elsewhere in this work.  Mrs. Barlow was born in Fredericksburg, Pa., June 23, 1845.  She was the oldest but one of her mother's children, and the oldest of two now living.  Mrs. Barlow was educated after the removal of her parents to Lynn Township, being at that time but nine years of age, and lived with her parents until her marriage.  She has borne her husband eight children, four of whom are deceased.  The living are Fannie L., born Feb. 12, 1868; Freeman S., Aug. 1, 1872; Mollie L., Jan. 28, 1874; and Blanche G., Aug. 5, 1880.

After the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Barlow they settled on the farm where they are now living, and since that time Mr. B. has made wonderful improvements on the place, and now has a good and productive farm.  He and his wife are members of the Baptist Church.  In politics Mr. B. is a Democrat.  Their children who have passed to the land beyond were Helen L., aged 14 years; Jessie M., aged 4 years; Freddie G., 1 year; and an infant son.


From the 1886 Portrait and Biographical Album of Knox County, Biographical Publishing Company, Chicago.  [Contributed by Bob Miller.]

REV. LUCIUS E. BARNARD.  Pages 778 and 779.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

E. F. BARNES.  A farmer, son of Ezra and Ann C. (Davis) Barnes, and was born May 7, 1840 in Clinton County, Ohio.  He was reared upon a farm and received his education in the common school.  He came from Ohio to Knox County in 1868.  He married Sarah E. Moon Sept. 29, 1859.  They have two sons and two daughters.  He has been a member of the Christian Church since 1857. He is a Democratic.  Post office, Hermon.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

M.S. BARNES.  Editor of the Galesburg Press, he was born in Malone, NY, Mar. 4, 1824, the son of William and Margaret Barnes of Vermont.  He received a liberal education; learned the printer's trade, and became an editor at 15.  He served in Second Illinois Regiment in the Mexican war; was [wounded] at the battle of Buena Vista.  After the war he conducted Southport-American, in Wisconsin.  In 1849, he became editor of the Chicago Daily Ledger, and when the war broke out was editor of the Rock Island Daily Register.  He helped raise 37th Illinois Infantry, was commissioned Colonel and served with distinction and afterwards was brevetted Brigadier General.  He left the army in 1863 and published the Rock Island Union.  Raised 140th Regiment, but did not enter the field.  Gen. B. is perhaps the oldest newspaper man in Illinois.  In political views he is a Democrat.


From the 1886 Portrait and Biographical Album of Knox County, Biographical Publishing Company, Chicago, page 367.  [Contributed by Pat Thomas.]

Anderson Barnett, now residing in Knoxville, was born in Randolph Township, Montgomery Co., Ohio, the 19th of February, 1811.  Like most retiring dispositions and lives, the even tenor of whose way influences and interests, without in any measure importuning the time and surroundings in which they are cast, that of Mr. Barnett affords a striking illustration.  In disposition his father was not unlike him in this particular.

The latter gentleman's name was John Barnett, a native of Goochland County, Va., where he was born on the 16th day of June, 1778.  The father of John was Arthenathas Barnett, a Virginian of prominence, who emigrated with his family into that State, afterward settling in Clinton County, Ohio, where he followed the occupation of farming.  Here he resided until his death.  The father of Mr. Barnett grew to manhood in his native county, being brought up on his father's farm until his marriage with Elizabeth Hutchins.  This lady was born in Goochland County, Va., April 15th, 1782.  Her husband emigrated to Ohio and settled in Montgomery County, he being one of the earliest of its settlers.  He was accompanied by his wife and three children, and his only worldly possessions on his arrival in Montgomery County were eighty-three dollars in money.  Purchasing 80 acres of land on time, he built a log cabin for himself and family, and immediately commenced farm improvements.  Here he continued to reside until 1838, when he sold his farm and removed to Indiana, settling in Fountain County, and buying an improved farm.  After residing here a few years he took up his residence in Fulton County and died October 7th, 1854, his wife having died on the 16th of December, 1850.

They were both members of the Society of Friends, but toward the close of her life Mrs. B. became a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  By this marriage were 12 children, 11 of whom grew to man and womanhood.  Two of these, however, Isaac and our subject, are the only members of the family, now living.

Mr. Barnett was the seventh child and attained to his manhood in his native county.  During his boyhood he assisted his father in clearing the farm, and to obtain an education availed himself of such opportunities as were presented at the time and under trying circumstances.  Having finally fitted himself for the position of teacher, he obtained an engagement in this capacity, which he united with farming operations.  He describes the schoolhouse as built of logs, with a puncheon floor and with wooden hinges on which to hang the door.  With these crudities and a few slab benches the furniture of the schoolhouse was complete.  At first he received a salary of only ten dollars per month, out of which he was to board himself.

On the tenth of May, 1832, he married Mrs. Margaret Mason, a native of Montgomery County, Ohio, where she was born Sept. 29, 1815.  She was the daughter of William and Nancy (Huey) Mason, natives of Virginia, who settled in Ohio, while that State was yet a territory.  At the time of this marriage Mr. and Mrs. Barnett located on his father's farm, where they lived contentedly until 1837, when they started with a pair of horses and wagon, and proceeded on their journey westward, bringing with them a portion of their household goods.  On their westward journey, they camped as best they could, and after enduring no little hardship arrived in Knox County August 25 of that year. He had previously purchased land on section 10, in what is now Orange township.  Here he built a log cabin.  During the following winter, he taught the second term of school in Orange township and several subsequent terms in different parts of the county.

He was elected one of the first members of the Board of Trustees in Orange township, in which capacity he served for six years, when in 1846 he was appointed Treasurer, and served continuously in this office during his residence in this township.  For 12 years he filled the position of Justice of the Peace, an office which he held with credit to himself and justice to others.  At one time he was compelled to sell 40 acres of his land in order to purchase stock with which to make a fresh start in life.  He next improved and fenced 120 acres of land, erected a brick dwelling and suitable barn and planted fruit trees of different varieties.  This residence he occupied until 1872, when he moved to Knoxville, where he now lives.

These excellent people have ten children now living, Elizabeth, wife of Henry Allen, lives in Nemaha County, Kan.; Nancy, wife of Thomas Colwell, living in Coffey County, Kan.; Celia, wife of Riley Lawrence and lives at Gilson, Knox County; Alexander who lives in Taylor County, Iowa; Louisa Jane, wife of J. W. Dennis, resides in Johnson County, Kan.; Irene, wife of Milton Dennis, lives in Franklin County, Kan.; Alice, wife of Henry Turner, who resides in Johnson County, Neb.; Albert, living in Holt County, Neb.; and Warren W. who has settled in Coffey County, Kan.

Mr. Barnett is prominent in his community as a theological student and is an earnest inquirer and commentator in Biblical matters.  His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and a lady remarkable for her devotion to every good cause, and earnestness in promoting the principles of a sound religion.  Mr. B. was first a Whig, but on the organization of the Republican Party he became identified with it.

*  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

From the 1886 Portrait and Biographical Album of Knox County, Biographical Publishing Company, Chicago, page 1008.  [Contributed by Pat Thomas.]

Poem written by Anderson Barnett.

Old Friends

"Old Friends: what magical words!
They are music embellished with love.
Emotions come forth from the sounds they produce
As light from the ether above.

The days of my childhood and youth,
My friends of those years long since past,
As long as my senses my thoughts can control,
Those soul-pleasing memories shall last.

As I sit by my fireside and think
Of my father and mother now dead,
My mind will revert to the scenes of my youth
And the many kind words that they said.

Their faces remembered so well,
Their features I cannot mistake,
So often in my dreams I go back to my youth
And ponder those scenes when awake.

Where are they? those friends that I knew
So well in the morning of my life?
My brothers and sisters who shared all my joys
And sorrows abounding so rife?

Companions endeared to me then
By many compassionate ties,
I now look back through the vista of years
To those pleasures and sorrows and sighs.

Many years have passed with their fruitage,
and flowers so brilliant and gay,
But those dear companions of childhood and youth,
Dear to me as life, where are they?


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

HENRY BARRINGER.  He is the son of Peter D. and Elizabeth Barringer, natives of Rensselaer County, NY, and was born Sept. 14, 1821.  He was a blacksmith, but changed his trade to that of carpenter in 1874.  He was in Co. K, 83rd Illinois Infantry.  In 1853, he removed to Pike County, IL , and to Wataga in 1857.  He married Margaret E. Simmons July 20, 1844, and they are the parents of two children, one son and one daughter.  He is a Close-Communion Baptist, uniting with the church in 1855.  He is a Republican.  P.O. Wataga.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

JOHN D. BARTLETT, Sr.  He was born at Norridge, VT, in 1805, the son of George C. Bartlett, a native of the same place, and Anna (Swain) Bartlett was born at Newark, NJ, removed to New York in 1807, to Ohio in 1814, then came to Rio Twp, Knox County in 1844.  He was connected with the U. S. Mail Service in Genesee County NY, and Postmaster 16 years in Rio.  He married Sarah Pryne and they have three sons and two daughters.  He is a farmer in good circumstances.  In politics a Republican.  P.O. Rio.


BartonAlpheus.jpg (98052 bytes)From June 26, 1865, military discharge papers.  [Contributed by Wayne Marschinke.]

ALPHEUS BARTON was born in Knox County, Illinois, circa 1846.  He served in Company D, 83rd Regiment of Illinois Infantry Volunteers from August 8, 1862, until his discharge on June 26, 1865, in Nashville, Tennessee.

 

 


From the 1886 Portrait and Biographical Album of Knox County, Biographical Publishing Company, Chicago, page 741

Thomas M. Barton is a farmer, a resident on section 16, in Knox Township, and is one of the most solid and substantial men in that vicinity. He is well known and popular in his county and township, and has been very prosperous in his chosen vocation. He was born in Chestnut Township, 3 November 1840, and is the son of Oxias and Rachel (Massie) Barton. He assisted his father on the farm during boyhood and was educated in the district schools.
He made his home under the parental roof until his marriage on 6 March 1862. This was celebrated with Amelia Humphrey as the other contracting party. He was born in Tuscarawas County, Ohio on 17 February 1845, and is the daughter of Elder Cyrus and Henrietta (Baughman) Humphrey. At the time of his marriage, Mr. Barton located in Chestnut Township, where he rented land for two years; was then in Knox Township two years, and subsequently bought the farm he now occupies. Seven children were born of their union - George H., Rachel L., John Q., Mary Henrietta, Cyrus A., Almond E. and Phebe Arizona.
Mr. Barton is a member of Pacific Lodge, No. 400, A.F.&A.M. and Wataga Lodge, I.O.O.F. and Knoxville, Lodge K. of L. George H. Barton is also a member of Pacific Lodge, No. 400.
Mr. B. has always been a Republican in politics, and takes considerable interest in the affairs of the nation, and has no long been an actor in political affairs that he knows much of the growth and progress of the Republican party. He cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln.
In the main Mr. Barton has been successful in life, but was the recipient of a heavy blow in the loss of his home in 1875. His house was a two-story frame building, and at six o'clock in the evening, on the 5th of August, in that year, the family being all at home, they were rendered almost entirely helpless with terror by a cyclone striking the house. It came upon them with tremendous force, tearing the house to atoms, yet, by some miracle, or other intervention of God's providence, no lives were lost, although all the family were more or less hurt, Mr. Barton having six ribs broken. Parts of the house were carried in every direction and for long distances. It was an hour of the greatest fear and trouble, yet so thankful were they to a protecting God for His goodness in saving their lives, that the loss of their home, though heavy, seemed to them as of minor consequence.
The husband and wife were laid for several months, and cared for the utmost kindness, and cared for with the utmost kindness and brotherly sympathy by the Masonic fraternity of Knoxville. All through his illness they paid the bills and made good his loss by rebuilding the house, which now stands where the old one was torn down, a monument of that charity which teaches us to do unto others as we would be done by.
Brother E.T. Eads was Worshipful Master of Pacific Lodge, No. 400, at the time of the cyclone. He and his wife were as a father and mother to the stricken family. They left nothing undone that they could do. Their kindness the family will never forget.

 


 

From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

CHARLES K. BASSETT.  He is the editor of the Abingdon Register, and was born in that city Feb. 25, 1859, the son of George and Nancy (Wilson) Bassett, the former a native of NY and the latter of Ohio.  Charles spent six years in the common schools of Abingdon and then commenced the printing business, issuing a tiny amateur paper.  For his journalistic career we refer to sketch of his paper in this book.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

HON. NEWTON BATEMAN.  President of Knox College, he was born in Cumberland County, NJ, on July 27, 1822.  He came to Illinois in 1833.  In 1835, he attended the anniversary exercises of Illinois College and was deeply impressed with the addresses of the graduates, and then and there he formed the determination that he too would deliver a graduate's oration from that platform.  Poverty stared him in the face and for four years he was prevented from commencing to execute his plans.  In 1839, he entered upon preparation.  So zealous were his efforts and so remarkable his powers of acquisition, that in less than four months he passed a satisfactory examination and entered the freshman class.  The rigid economy practiced, the arduous labor performed --- chopping wood, sweeping rooms, making fires, besides teaching at intervals, and his constancy of purpose and application and the marvelous rapidity with which he advanced appear like a stirring romance.  While fitting for college he studied in the woods in warm weather, but in the cool season he selected a huge elm tree which stood near his home.  It was hollow.  He cut a hole in one side for a door, cleared it out and furnished it with a rough stool and table and a piece of carpet.  In June, he did deliver his graduating oration from that same platform.  After a brief attendance at Lane Theological Seminary at Cincinnati he traveled extensively in several states.  In 1845, he opened a private school in St. Louis.  In 1847, he was chosen Professor of Mathematics in St. Charles College, MO, and remained there till 1851, when he went to Jacksonville, where he was elected Principal of the Public Schools.  While there he was twice elected County Superintendent of Schools.  In 1854, he assisted in organizing the State Teachers Assoc. and was one of the committee who established the "Illinois Teacher".  In 1858, he was chosen Principal of Jacksonville Female Academy.  He was first nominated for position of State Superintendent of Public Instruction by the teachers in convention in 1855.  In 1858, he was elected to that office.  He was elected President of Knox College in 1874.

*  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

From the 1904 Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois Edited by John S. Wilcox.  [Contributed by Todd Walter.]

Newton Bateman, A.M., L. L. D., educator and editor-in-chief of the "Historical Encyclopedia of Ill.", was born at Fairfield, New Jersey, July 27, 1822, of mixed English and Scotch ancestry; was brought by his parents to Illinois in 1833; in youth enjoyed only limited educational advantages, but graduated from Illinois College at Jacksonville in 1843, supporting himself during his college course wholly by his own labor.  Having contemplated entering the Christian ministry, he spent the following year at Lane Theological Seminary, but was compelled to withdraw on account of failing health, when he gave a year to travel.  He then entered upon his life work as a teacher by engaging as Principal of an English and classical school in St. Louis, remaining there two years, when he accepted that Professorship of  Mathematics in St. Charles College, at St. Charles, Mo., continuing in that position four years (1847-51).  Returning to Jacksonville, Ill., in the latter year, he assumed the principalship of the main public school of that city.  Here he remained seven years, during four of them discharging the duties of  County Superintendent of Schools for Morgan County.

In the fall of 1857 he became principal of Jacksonville Female Academy, but the following year was elected State Superintendent of Public Instruction, having been nominated for the office by the Republican State Convention of 1858, which put Abraham Lincoln in nomination for United States Senate.  By successive reelections he continued in this office 14 years, serving continuously from 1859 to 1875, except two years (1863-65), as a result of his defeat for reelection in 1862.  He was also endorsed for the same office by the State Teachers' Association in 1856, but was not formally nominated by a State convention.  During his incumbency the Illinois common schools system was developed and brought to the state of efficiency which it has so well maintained.  He also prepared some seven volumes of biennial reports, portions of which have been re-published in five different languages of Europe, besides a volume of  "Common School Decisions," originally published by authority of the General Assembly, and of which several editions have since been issued.  This volume has been recognized by the courts, and still regarded as authoritative on the subjects to which it relates.

In addition to his official duties during a part of this period, for three years he served as editor of "The Illinois Teacher," and was one of the committee of three which prepared the bill adopted by Congress creating the National Bureau of Education.  Occupying a room in the old State Capital at Springfield adjoining that used as an office by Abraham Lincoln during the first candidacy of the latter for the Presidency, in 1860, a close intimacy sprang up between the two men, which enabled the "School master," as Mr. Lincoln playfully called the doctor, to acquire an insight into the character of the future emancipator of a race, enjoyed by few man of that time, and of which he gave evidence by his lectures full of interesting reminiscence and eloquent appreciation of the high character of the "Martyr President."

A few months after his retirement from the State Superintendency (1875), Dr. Bateman was offered and accepted the Presidency of Knox College at Galesburg, remaining until 1893, when he voluntarily tendered his resignation.  This, after having been repeatedly urged upon the board, was finally accepted; but that body immediately, and by unanimous vote, appointed him President Emeritus and Professor of Mental and Moral Science, under which he continued to discharges duties as a special lecturer as his health enabled him to do so.

During his incumbency as President of Knox College, he twice received a tender of the Presidency of  Iowa State University and the Chancellorship of two other important state institutions.  He also served, by appointment of successive governors between 1877 in 1891, as a member of the state board of health, for four years of this period being President of the Board.

In February, 1878, Dr. Bateman, unexpectedly and without solicitation on his part, received from President Hayes an appointment as "Assay Commissioner" to examine and test the fineness and weight of United States coins, in accordance with the provisions of the act of Congress of June 22nd, 1874, and discharged the duties assigned at the mint in Philadelphia.

Never of a very strong physique, which was rather weakened by his privations while a student and his many years of close confinement to mental labor, towards the close of his life Dr. Bateman suffered much from a chest trouble which finally developed into "angina pectoris," or heart disease, from which, as a result of the most painful attack, he died at his home in Galesburg, Oct. 21, 1897.  The event produced the most profound sorrow, not only among his associates in the faculty and among the students of Knox College, but a large number of friends throughout the state, who had known him officially or personally, and had learned to admire his many noble and beautiful traits of character.  His funeral, which occurred in Galesburg on Oct. 25, called out an immense concourse of sorrowing friends.  Almost the last labors performed by Dr. Bateman were in the revision of matter for this volume, in which he manifested deepest interest from the time of his assumption of the duties of its editor-in-chief.  At the time of his death he had the satisfaction of knowing that his work in this field was practically complete.

Dr. Bateman had been twice married, first on Aug. 13, 1850 to Miss Sarah Dayton of Jacksonville, who died in 1857, and a second time in October, 1859, to Miss Annie N. Tyler, of Massachusetts (but for sometime a teacher in Jacksonville Female Academy), who died, May 28, 1878.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

JOHN BECKER.  A merchant and farmer, he was born in Otsego County, NY, on June 10, 1811, the son of Philip and Catherine (Wager) Becker, the former of Otsego County, the latter of Columbia County NY.  He spent his childhood on a farm and his educational opportunities were limited to the district schools of hi native county.  He engaged in the mercantile business at the age of 18 and continued in it until 1866.  In 1844, he came to Victoria in this county, and built a store and started a business.  In 1845, June 10, he married Mary Jane Smith [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a John Becker marrying a Mary Jane Smith in Knox County on October 12, 1845], by whom he has had seven children, of whom only three are now living.  They removed to Galesburg in 1866.  Mr. B.'s attention has been divided between merchandising and farming, he having purchased and managed a large farm which he still owns.  He is a Republican.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

GEORGE BEECHTEL.  He is a carpenter, born in Pennsylvania in 1831, the son of John Y., and Susanna (Gerhart) Beechtel, of PA. He was educated in common schools, was musician in the 16th Illinois Infantry.  He came to Illinois in 1856, went to Kansas in 1870, and returned in 1874.  He married Miss E. S. Haines in 1868; two children of the four born to them are now living.  P. O. Galesburg; politics, Republican.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

GEORGE BEHRINGER.  A farmer, he is the son of Michael and Helen Behringer, natives of Germany.  He was born in Galesburg on Nov. 4, 1856, moved to Sparta Twp. in 1875.  He is independent in politics.  P.O. Wataga.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

CLARK BELDEN.  A farmer, son of W. O. and Nancy Belden of New York, he was born in Cedar Township, Knox County, Illinois, in 1855.  He was educated at the district school.  He removed to Iowa but returned after a short stay.  Mr. Belden has always been quite active in society circles.  He is a Republican.  Post Office, Galesburg.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

MARCUS BELDEN.  A farmer and grain merchant, he was born in Greenfield, Saratoga County, NY, on Apr. 1, 1815, the son of Aaron and Sarah (Wood) Belden of the same county.  His early life was spent on a farm and his education obtained in the common schools and by individual effort.  When he was 10 years old, his parents moved to Genesee County, NY; and he came to Galesburg in the Spring of 1840.  Since he settled in Illinois he has been engaged in farming and dealing heavily in grain.  He has held the office of Mayor of Galesburg and has been Alderman for six years.  On April 21, 1846, he married Ann Norton [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a Marcus Belden marrying a Ann Norton in Bureau County on April 21, 1846] who was the mother of four girls.  He married Louvica Rigby for his second wife, by whom he has two sons and two daughters.  He has been a member of the Congregational Church for years, and an Elder in the "First Church of Christ" for twenty years.  He was a strong Abolitionist and an active member of the Underground Railroad Company.  He has hauled many loads of wheat to Chicago and has camped opposite the Tremont House.  P. O. Galesburg.


From the 1912 History of Knox County - Volume II, The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, Chicago, page 319.  [Contributed by Pat Thomas.]

William Lorenzo Belden is a retired farmer of Galesburg, who for many years was associated with general agricultural pursuits in Orange township and also engaged in the practice of veterinary surgery.  The success which crowned his labors enables him at the present time to enjoy the comforts of life without further recourse to business activity.  He was born at Cayuga Lake, New York, in 1836, a son of Alonzo and Hannah (Swartz) Belden, who were also natives of the Empire state.  They removed to Ohio when their son William was a lad of seven years and in 1850 came to Knox county, Illinois.  The father was a plasterer by trade and spent his last years in this county, while his wife died in Nebraska, where she had gone after the death of her husband.  In their family were seven children, of whom William L. and a brother, George C., are the only ones now living.  Two of the brothers served as soldiers in the Union army during the Civil war, George C. and Charles, who was killed by the notorious Rand at Gilson.

After spending the first seven years of his life in the state of New York, William L. Belden accompanied his parents to Ohio and for about seven years was a resident of Marion county, in that state.  He came to Knox county, Illinois, when a lad of fourteen years and for more than six decades has resided within its borders, witnessing the many changes which have occurred as the work of development and improvement has been carried forward.  Settling in Orange township, near Knoxville, he began farming and from a timber tract developed a richly improved farm of eighty-eight and three-fourths acres.  He made all of the improvements upon the place, set out an orchard, erected substantial buildings and built good fences.  Year after year, the work was carried steadily forward and, as the result of early spring plowing and planting, good crops were gathered in the autumn.  The methods which he pursued in the development of his land were both practical and progressive and his crops found a ready sale on the market.  He continued to make his home upon his farm until 1911, when he left the care of the property to others and took up his abode in Galesburg, where he is now living.  He still owns the old home place and while residing thereon he engaged in the practice of veterinary surgery.

In 1865 Mr. Belden was united in marriage to Miss Emily Hawley [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a William M. Belden marrying a Emily E. Hanley in Knox County on September 15, 1864], who was born in Orange township, this county, and is a daughter of Henry and Sarah (Westerfield) Hawley.  Her father came to Illinois from New York and established his home in Orange township, where he carried on farming throughout his remaining days.  To him and his wife were born eight children, of whom two sons and two daughters yet survive, all being residents of Knox county.  The children of Mr. and Mrs. Belden are: Henry A., who follows farming in Kansas; Nellie, the wife of Charles Miller, of Iowa; Loretta, the wife of Milo Brown, also of Kansas; Mrs. Mattie Bowhay, who likewise makes her home in the Sunflower state; and Zenana, yet at home.

On attaining his majority William L. Belden proudly cast his first vote for republican candidates and has since staunchly supported the party.  He has served as road commissioner and in other local offices but has not sought or desired political preferment.  From the age of fourteen years he has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and has guided his life by its teachings, ever endeavoring to follow the Golden Rule.  Undoubtedly he has made mistakes - as who has not - but they have been of judgment rather than of intention, for at all times he has sought to do to others as he would have them do unto him.  He has now reached the advanced age of seventy-five years and during sixty-one years of this time has been a resident of Knox county, so that he has witnessed much of its progress and improvement, aiding at different times in work that has contributed to its growth and development.  He has personal knowledge of many things which are to others matters of history and his memory recalls many interesting events of the early days.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

JAMES BELLWOOD.  He is a farmer, and the son of Seth M. and Polly (Shumaker) Bellwood, natives of Ohio.  He was born in this county Mar. 3, 1845, where in the common schools he was educated.  H served as School Director, and is Constable.  He was married Aug. 11, 1870 to Sarah E. Shumaker [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a James Bellwood marrying a Sarah E. Shoemaker in Knox County on August 11, 1870].  Two children have blessed this union, one dead.  A Democrat.  Post Office, St. Augustine.


From the 1886 Portrait and Biographical Album of Knox County, Biographical Publishing Company, Chicago, page 546.  [Contributed by Todd Walter.]

ELI M. BENFIELD, dealer in groceries and provisions, established his business in 1883, in Abingdon, of which city he is a resident.  He may be considered one of Knox County's most wide-awake and industrious citizens, and is respected by all who know him for his upright character and his ability in business.  He engaged in his present vocation, leaving his occupation as a butcher to do so, at which he has been fairly successful.

Mr. Benfield is of German descent and was born in Crawford County, Pa., May 27, 1838, and is the son of Daniel and Catherine (Baughman) Benfield.  He came to DeKalb Co., Ill., in 1857, and, removing to Maquon in 1858, began farming.  Entering the Government service as a mechanic in the late war, he was engaged six months at Nashville, Tenn.

He was united in marriage Jan.13, 1858, at Maquon, with Elizabeth Housh [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a Ely M. Benfield marrying a Elizabeth Housh in Knox County on January 13, 1859].  She is the daughter of David Housh, and was born July 28, 1841, at Maquon.  The union of Mr. and Mrs. Benfield has been productive of the birth of eight children, one son and seven daughters, as follows: Charles D., born Sept. 8, 1860, Principal of the Commercial Department of Hedding College; Bessie Belle, born May 23, 1867; Amanda Jane, born Feb. 26, 1869; Catherine Lulu, born June 27, 1871; Melissa D. H., born Sept. 3, 1874; Sarah Blanche, born March 6, 1876; Mary Adeline, born March 11, 1878, and died Sept. 6, of the same year, and Jessie Eveline, born Dec. 25, 1884, in Abingdon.  All the above children, except the last named, were born in Haw Creek Township.

Mr. Benfield's father was born in Lehigh County, Pa., and was of German descent.  His mother was a native of the same place and of like ancestry.  Mrs. Benfield's parents were pioneers in Knox County, and her mother, who was born in Greencastle, Ind., claimed as ancestors people of English, Irish, Scotch and Welsh nationality.

Her father, David Housh, was born in Kentucky, July 29, 1880, and died May 24, 1879.  At the age of three years he moved to the frontier north of the Ohio River and settled in the wilds of Indiana, among the Indians, where the face of a white man was seldom seen.  At the beginning of the War of 1812 the white families were compelled to move into forts, which they occupied for three years.  He witnessed one or two massacres, in one losing some relatives, after which, with a brother, he started out to avenge them through the blood of whatever Indians they were able to put to death.  He heard the great and noted speech of the warrior Tecumseh, before the battle of Tippecanoe, and was often heard to pronounce it one of the best efforts.  In 1826, he married Elizabeth Thornbrough and again moved to the frontier, where they lived until 1836.  At the close of that year he moved to Knox County and settled in Haw Creek Township and made a few acquaintances, Daniel Meek and John Dawdy being among the first, and as all three were extremely fond of hunting, and possessed a love for fast horses, a spirit of rivalry existed in the endeavor to see who could get the best.  Mr. H. laid out a mile track, which afterward became quite a resort for patrons of the turf.  He raised fine blooded horses, in which he took much pride, and also engaged in milling and distilling, and later in mercantile pursuits.  He cast his first vote for President with the Jackson Democrats, and has voted at each election the same ticket.  He retired from business with the exception of giving some attention to farming, enjoyed a ripe old age and died honored and respected.

Eli M. Benfield moved to Abingdon in December, 1879.  While at Maquon he was a contractor and builder, and had also an interest in a harness business.  He possessed a love for farming pursuits, which he followed in a small degree, but after the war came to the city in which he at present resides, and engaged in the occupation of a butcher until 1883.  In that year he established his present business, as previously stated.  He and his wife are parents of three children, and they are people of influence, kindly feeling, and labor for the good of others.  They are connected with the Methodist Episcopal Church and are respected by the community of which they are members.  Politically he votes the Democratic ticket.

(The statement in the last paragraph about "three children" is confusing since eight children are named in the third paragraph.)


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

WILLIAM BENNETT.  A farmer, the son of George and Betsey Bennett of England, he was born in England in 1831.  He spent his early life till 25 years of age in a cotton manufactory after which he turned his attention to farming.  His education was obtained chiefly in evening schools.  He came from England to Knox County, Illinois in 1856.  He has filled the office of School Director for six years in this county.  He married Sarah Chapman in 1860 [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a William Bennett marrying a Sarah Chapman in Fulton County on January 29, 1861], by whom he has had three children, two of whom are living.  His political views are Republican.  Post Office, Douglass.


From the History of the State of Kansas by William G. Cutler.  [Contributed by Todd Walter.]

J. W. BERGEN, superintendent of the Seneca Mills, was born in 1829 in Menard County, Ill.  He attained man's stature on a farm.  He spent twelve years in Galesburg, Ill., and came from Mason City, Ill., to Seneca in 1879.  He married in his and her native county, Miss Lucretia Curry. They have two sons - Abraham G., born in Knox County Ill., and now a theological student in Lincoln, Ill., and George I., now in mercantile business in Lincoln, Ill.  The family faith is the Cumberland Presbyterian, though through lack of organization in Seneca, Mr. Bergen worships with the Congregationalists, of which church he is now a deacon and also church clerk.


The Honorable A. W. BERGGREN was the first sheriff to occupy the jail built by Ira K. Stevens in 1874. He also served as a State Senator and was for a number of years the warden of the State Penitentiary at Joliet.

August Werner Berggren came to Knox county in 1856 from Sweden. He is buried in Hope Cemetery in Galesburg (1840-1921) with his wife Christine Nasland (1845-1921).

        *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

AUGUSTUS W. BERGGREN, Sheriff; was born in "Amot," Sweden, Aug. 17, 1840.  He is the son of Johan and Karin Berggren; he received his education in the country schools of Sweden and by instructions from his father, who was a well-read man.  He spent his early life until 14 on a farm.  At that time he contracted to serve a five-year apprenticeship at the tailor's trade, the first three for his board, the last two for a very small additional compensation.  In 1856, his father, five brothers, and one sister and himself started to America, and after a nine weeks' voyage in a small sailing vessel they reached New York, from whence they proceeded to Oneida, Knox County.  The subject of this sketch worked at his trade in Victoria the first year after his arrival, for $8 per month, at the expiration of which he came to Galesburg, where he has lived since, except four years spent in Monmouth, Warren County.  He was elected City Justice in 1869, at the age of 29, and while filling that office in 1872, was elected Sheriff by the Republican Party; he was again re-elected in 1874, 1876, and 1878 nominated for the fourth term, and again re-elected.  Mr. Berggren has a fine talent for music, and for several years teaching music was his principal occupation; he was leader of a string band at Monmouth and at Galesburg; taught and arranged music for bands.  He was married to Christine Naslund, March 10, 1866 [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a Augustus W. Berggren marrying a Christina Nashlund in Knox County on March 18, 1866], which has resulted in a family of one daughter and three sons; he is a prominent member of both the Masonic and Odd Fellow orders, and a high official in each; he has been a member of the Swedish M. E. Church since 1870, and is president of the Board of Trustees of the church in Galesburg.  Politically he is a staunch Republican.  P.O. Galesburg.

*  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

From the 1899 Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and Knox County, Munsell Publishing Company.  [Picture provided by Jim Ferris.]

AUGUST WERNER BERGGREN is emphatically a self-made man. He has risen from the service of an apprenticeship to exalted stations of honor and trust. He was born in Amots Bruk, Ockelbo Socken, Sweden, August 17, 1840, and is the son of Johan and Karin (Hanson) Berggren. His father was a self-educated man, winning his way to success by his shrewdness and native ability. He was a great reader, but he learned his most valuable lessons in the school of experience. He held several minor offices and looked after cases in courts, administering estates and the like. For thirteen years he ran a flouring mill. Afterwards he purchased a farm on which he lived until he emigrated to this county in 1856.

Mr. Berggren is an example of the accomplishment of much in spite of limited educational advantages. He attended the village schools in Sweden, until the was 14 years of age, living at the same time, on a farm.

Then he was apprenticed to learn the tailor's trade. The contract drawn by his father provided that for the first three years he should work for his master without remuneration; for the fourth year he was to receive thirty-five riksdaler; and for the fifth year, forty (a riksdaler being about equal to 27 cents in American money). The father was to furnish the cloth for the tailor to make the apprentice's clothing. In case of death of the apprentice during the first year of his apprenticeship the father should pay the tailor fifteen riksdaler. When the father decided to emigrate to this country he was obliged to pay the master tailor fifty riksdaler for the release of his son.

Mr. Berggren, first came to Oneida, and then went to Victoria, where he found employment in the tailoring establishment of Jonas Hallstrom, at eight dollars a month and board and washing for one year.

He then came to Galesburg and worked at his trade, where opportunities were presented. In 1860, he moved to Monmouth, Warren County and worked for Captain Denman, a merchant tailor of that place. About the close of the war, he returned to Galesburg and became a solicitor of life insurance.

During this time he devoted considerable attention, with fair success, to music. He played the violin, became a leader of string bands in Galesburg and Monmouth, and arranged music for the same.

Mr. Berggren has no military record. At the first call for volunteers to put down the Rebellion he went to Knoxville and joined the Swedish company, commanded by Captain Holmberg. Two companies were there: one composed of Americans; the other, of Swedes. The former was mustered into service; the latter, disbanded. He then went to Monmouth, where he remained until his return to Galesburg in 1864.

Mr. Berggren has held many important offices. In 1869, he was elected Justice of the Peace in the City of Galesburg. While holding that office he was nominated by the republican convention for the office of Sheriff, and elected in the Fall of 1872. With great credit, he held the office for four terms, and his books and reports are spoken of to this day as models worthy of imitation. In 1880, while yet Sheriff, he was nominated and elected Senator from the Twenty-second District, composed of Knox and Mercer counties. Four years afterwards, he was reelected from the new district, composed of Knox and Fulton counties. When the Senate was organized in 1887, he was chosen President protempore of that body. On May 1, 1889, the Governor appointed him Warden of the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet, which position he resigned to take active supervision of the Covenant Mutual Life Association of Illinois, with principal offices in this city.

His public spirit is fully shown by his connection with various public enterprises, such as the Galesburg Stoneware Company; The National Perefoyd Company; The Galesburg Paving Brick Company; the Galesburg National Bank, having been a Director of the same since its organization. He was a member of the Berggren and Lundeen firm, later the J. A. Lundeen Company, and still later the Berggren Clothing Company. From its organization, for twenty years, he was President of The Covenant Mutual Life Association, and for the last two years has been its Treasurer, still holding that position.

Mr. Berggren is both an Odd Fellow and a Mason, joining the former order in 1868; the latter, in 1869. He is a member of the several Masonic bodies in this city, and in the Order of Odd Fellows has taken a very active interest, filling every office of the subordinate bodies and the principal offices of the Grand Lodge. He was Grand Master and presided over the deliberations of the Grand Lodge at Danville IL, in 1880, and represented the Grand Lodge in the Sovereign Grand Lodge at Baltimore MD.

Mr. Berggren has broadened his life and added greatly to the storehouse of information by quite extensive travel. He has visited almost every State in the Union, and in 1882, took an extensive trip through England, France, Belgium, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, Scotland, and Ireland. His charities have been of a practical kind. He has given to the Swedish M. E. Church and parsonage, to several other churches, Knox College, Lombard Gymnasium, and Cottage Hospital.

His religious affiliations are with the Swedish M. E. Church, although in 1856, he was confirmed in Sweden in the Lutheran Church. He served as lay delegate to the General Conference in Cincinnati in 1880.

In politics, he is a staunch republican. He is not only a worker, but has been one of the leaders in the party.

He was married March 8, 1866, to Christina Naslund [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a Augustus W. Berggren marrying a Christina Nashlund in Knox County on March 18, 1866], whose parents came to this country in 1854, joining the Bishop Hill Colony. Six children were born to them, Capitola Maud, Guy Werner, Ralph Augustus, Claus Eugene, Jay Valentine, and Earl Hugo. Ralph Augustus was run over by a train of cars and killed in 1887.


From the 1886 Portrait and Biographical Album of Knox County, Biographical Publishing Company, Chicago, page 463.  [Contributed by Pat Thomas.]

M. H. Best & O. D. Harris.  This firm was organized March 5, 1885, as manufacturers of and dealers in harness, saddles, and horse-finishing goods.  Five men are employed in their establishment as mechanics, and they handle everything in their line.  They carry an average stock of $1,000 and have a large custom.  The business was started in 1861, by Mr. William Best, who conducted in successfully till March 1885, when he sold out to the present firm.

M. H. Best, of this firm, was born in Knox County, and has been a resident of Abingdon since 1861.  He was married June 23, 1885, Detroit, Michigan, to Miss Orpha Florentine, daughter of James Florentine.  She was born in Grand Haven, Michigan.

Mr. O. D. Harris was born in Hancock County, and came to this county in 1863, having made a permanent residence here since that time.  Their establishment is the only one the kind in the city, and is conducted with such fairness and enterprise proprietors are among the most public-spirited citizens of the town, and deserve credit no less than patronage for conducting a business which not only assists others to employment, but is a benefit to the entire community.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

GEORGE BEVARD.  A farmer.  He was born in Huntington County, PA, on April 16, 1801 and is the son of John B. and Hester (Smith) Bevard.  His father was born in Ireland and his mother in Maryland.  His early life was passed on a farm and his education was such as the common schools afforded.  He removed from Pennsylvania to Ohio when that country was new.  He left Ohio and came to Fulton County, IL, in 1845, from there to Knox County in 1854.  He was married to Hannah Crone Sept. 21, 1826, which union resulted in ten children, of whom four sons and three daughters are living.  He has been a member of the Christian Church since 1837.  He is a Republican.  P. O. Hermon.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

CELIA R. BEVIER.  A. L. R. Bevier was born in Ulster County, NY, on July 16, 1820, and her mother Adaline (Misner) Bevier was a native of Sullivan County, NY, born April 20, 1826.  Celia was born at LaFayette, Stark County, IL on May 23, 1855, united with the Stark County Congregational Church, was received by Elder Delle of LaFayette.  Post Office, Mitchelville, Iowa.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

WILLIAM BIGGERSTAFF.  A farmer, he was born in Athens County, Ohio on 11 Sept. 1803, and is the son of John and Mary Biggerstaff, the former of Virginia and the latter of Pennsylvania.  He was educated in the common schools, and learned the harness-maker's trade in youth.  Later in life he abandoned that business and devoted himself to farming.  He also engaged in the mercantile business in Gilson for a time.  He came to Knox County in 1851.  In 1823, he married Mary Kirgan, and as second wife he married Debora Ducenberry in 1877 [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a William Biggerstaff marrying a Deborah Dusenberry in Knox County on January 1, 1877].  He joined the M. E. Church in 1833.  He is a Democrat.  Post Office, Elba Center.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

George P. Binge, farmer; resides on Section 1, Walnut Grove Township.  Postoffice, Galva, Henry county, Ill.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

Samuel. H. Bishop, farmer, was born Feb. 24, 1837, in the State of Pennsylvania; his parents were John M. and Jane Elizabeth Bishop, the former a native of New York and the latter of New Jersey; he enjoyed only the advantages of a common school education; he came West to Indiana in 1852, and to Knox County in 1860.  He was married Jan. 27, 1864, to Amelia Calkins [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a Samuel H. Bishop marrying a Amelia E. Calkins in Knox County on January 27, 1864], and has three sons and one daughter living, and one daughter deceased; joined the M. E. Church in 1861, is Class-Leader and Secretary of the church.  Politically is a Republican.  Postoffice, Oneida.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

JOHN L. BLAIR.  He is a physician in Abingdon.  He was born in Franklin County, PA, on Sept. 18, 1845, the son of James and Mary (Lawton) Blair, the former of Maryland and the latter a native of Ireland.  Dr. B. was educated at Dickinson Seminary and Marshall College, PA, preparing himself for the study of medicine.  He entered the University of Michigan, after which he went to the University of Maryland where he graduated holding a place in front rank.  He has also attended lectures at the Universities of New York and Edinburgh.  In a scientific point of view the Dr. has but few equals, which is shown in a clock constructed by him alone in a period of a year, during leisure.  As a piece of mechanism it has no equal.  In it are combined the sciences of astronomy, anatomy, mathematics and mechanics.  It tells the time of day in any part of the world.  It explains, longitude and time.  There are three skeletons: one strikes the time of day; one plays a tune every hour five minutes before striking; the third represents Father Time.  On top of the clock stands two small forts -- Moultrie and Sumter -- mounted with small cannons.  Sumter is fired on by Beauregard, giving the date.  It also shows the assassination of Lincoln by Booth, who fires at Lincoln and he drops forward.  This is only visible the day of the year the President was killed.  It also shows any historical scene you may want, and as many.  It represents the fall of the southern Confederacy with Jeff Davis in petticoats.  Astronomically this clock shows the earth passing around the sun every 365 1/4 days, and on its own axis each day; in passing through its orbit, goes through the twelve constellations or signs of the zodiac, as well as through her seasons she enters her solstices.  It shows the moon and all its movements, and all the planets and their movements.  Haley's comet is shown and other wonders.  He was married to Sadie Ann Anderson on Feb. 27, 1867, who has borne him two children.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

SALA BLAKESLEE.  A farmer and the son of Sala and Mary (Merchant) Blakeslee of Connecticut, he was born Jan. 14, 1805 in the State of Connecticut.  His education was limited to the common schools.  He worked a while at the blacksmith trade in his youth but abandoned it for the farm.  His parents moved to Ohio in 1817, and he came to Knox County in 1834.  He was married on Jan. 10, 1830 [wife's name not listed].  He has held the offices of School Director and Commissioner of Highways for many years.  Post Office, Douglass.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

JONATHAN BLANCHARD.  He was born in Rockingham, VT, on Jan. 19, 1811.  He shared the labors and the sports of New England farmer boys, laying there the foundation for that superb physique for which he has been so distinguished.  He attended the district school of his native place, going thence to Chester Academy where he fitted for College.  He graduated at Middlebury College in 1832.  Though but twenty-one years of age he was immediately elected Preceptor of Plattsburg Academy, where he taught two years to earn money to continue his studies.  Previous to this he had consecrated himself to the work of the ministry, and in 1834 he entered Andover Theological Seminary where he remained two years.  He spent a year in Pennsylvania, leaving the seminary, battling for anti-slavery.  He then finished his theological course and graduated at Lane Seminary, Cincinnati.  He was ordained and then installed over the Sixth Presbyterian Church in that city Oct. 31, 1838, where he remained nine years, serving with so great fidelity that 500 were added to the church.  He was active in Christian temperance.  Stationed there on the boundary between the slave States and the free his anti-slavery zeal was well fired up.  He was sent in 1843 as a delegate to the Second World's Anti-slavery Convention in London and was there elected the American Vice-president of that body.  In 1846, he was called to the Presidency at Knox College.  He and his amiable wife identify themselves with every interest of the college.  His presidency was of fourteen years. he was thirty-five years of age when he came to Galesburg.  The first sermon in Oneida was preached by him.


From the 1880 History of Keokuk County, Iowa.  [Contributed by Todd Walter.]

S. W. Bland, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O., Sigourney; born in Fountain county Indiana, May 25, 1829; in 1833, when quite young, he moved with his parents to Knox County, Illinois, and was raised on a farm and received the advantages of a common school education; from there he came to Iowa, and settled on the place where he now resides, in 1866; owns a pleasant place of seventy six acres of good land; he married Miss A. A. Williamson a native of Menard county, Illinois, in October 1850; they have five children: William H., John W., James W., Charles W., and S. O.; have lost one: George V.; Mr. and Mrs. B. are members of the M. E. Church.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

CYRUS BLISS.  A farmer, who was born in 1834 in Chautauqua NY, the son of Z. G. and Mabel (Gillet) Bliss, the former a native of New York and the latter of CT.  Early life was passed on the farm.  His general character in youth was honest and upright.  He moved to Peoria County, IL, in 1837 and settled there until 1853 when he moved to Knox County.  In 1855, he was married to Angelina Smith [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a Cyrus Bliss marrying a Angeline Smith in Knox County on February 25, 1855], and they are now the parents of six children.  In 1859, he us untied with the Christian Church. He has always been engaged in farming and been quite successful.  P. O. Yates City.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

JOHN L. BLOOMFIELD.  He is a farmer, the son of Isaac and Mary (Hahn) Bloomfield, of Hamilton County, OH.  He was born June 9, 1836, in Butler County, OH.  He spent his youth on a farm and obtained his education th the common schools.  His parents removed to Montgomery County, IN, in 1837, and he came to Knox County in 1845.  He first married to Elizabeth Cosiah Apr. 1, 1858 [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a John L. Bloomfield marrying a Elizabeth Coziahr in Knox County on April 1, 1858], and as his second wife, he married Hannah C. Gritton June 25, 1868 [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a John L. Bloomfield marrying a Hannah C. Gretton in Knox County on June 25 1868].  He has two sons by his first wife and four sons by his second wife, three living and one dead.  He is a liberal Democrat.  Post Office, Rio.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

WILLIAM BLOOMFIELD.  A farmer, he was born in Indiana Aug. 18, 1837, the son of Isaac and Mary (Hahn) Bloomfield, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Indiana.  He was educated in the district schools, spent his youth on a farm and his mature life in the same vocation.  He came west and settled in Rio Twp.  He was married to Euphemia Reed Oct. 13, 1865 [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a William Bloomfield marrying a Euphemia E. Reed in Knox County on October 12, 1865], and their union has resulted in three sons and two daughters, one son deceased.  P.O. Rio.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

Eleanor (Rice) Blue.  Mrs. Blue was born in Crawford County, Indiana, 17 Jan 1826.  Her parents , Jonathan and Margaret Rice, were natives of Hardin County, NY.  She received a common-school education, and was married to Wm. B. Blue; and is the mother of five children.  Post Office, Henderson.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

SAMUEL BODEN.  A farmer, he was born in Pennsylvania on 14 Mar 1809.  He is the son of Andrew and Margaret (Fitchjarves) Boden, the former born in PA and the latter born in Ireland.  His education was limited to the common schools of Pennsylvania.  He was reared on a farm and continued a farmer from choice.  He came from PA to Ohio in 1838 and thence to Knox County in 1848.  He has been a member of the M. E. Church since 1842.  A Democrat. P.O. Maquon.


From the 1887 Biographical & Historical Record of Ringgold & Union Counties, Iowa.  [Contributed by Todd Walter.]

Addison N. Boggs, residing on section 35, Union Township, was born in Nicholas County, West Virginia, July 6, 1849, the youngest son of Elliott & Eleanor Boggs.  His father was born in Gallia County, Ohio, and his mother in Greenbrier County, West Virginia.  They were the parents of six children - Mrs. Lovina Carter and Mrs. Sarah Fuller, living in Illinois; Mrs. Elizabeth Murnahan, in Mitchell County, Kansas; William, living in Red Willow County, Nebraska; James was killed by bushwhackers in West Virginia, and Addison N, our subject, who was the fifth child.  Our subject lived in his native State till thirteen years old.  Then at the breaking out of the late war, his father, who was a staunch Union man, was persecuted beyond endurance and finally imprisoned by bushwhackers.  After being confined at Staunton for two months he was released, but before reaching his home he was again arrested, the only charge brought against him being that of loyalty to the Union.  After his second arrest he made his escape by night.

A violent storm favored his flight and saved him from a pursuit which meant death, and on reaching the Union lines he received the protection of Colonel now General Cook.  The spring of 1862 found the family united in Gallia County, Ohio, where they resided three years, removing thence to Abingdon, Knox County, Illinois.  Late in the fall of 1875, the parents came to Ringgold County, Iowa, and made their home on section 35, Union township, where the father died in September 1882, aged seventy-one years.  The mother now lives with her daughter, Mrs. Sarah Fuller, in Stark county, Illinois.  Addison N. Boggs, whose name heads this sketch was united in marriage in Marion County, Iowa in October 1871, to Miss Mary Johnston, who was born in Knox County, Illinois, July 1, 1851, a daughter of J. R. Johnston, and to this union have been born three children - James, Ella, and Roscoe C. 

After residing in Knox County, Illinois, ten years, Mr. Boggs, in 1873 , came to Iowa, and first located in Marion County where he resided one year, and in April 1874 came to Ringgold County, where he lived in Monroe Township over a year, owning a farm in that township on sections 1 and 12.  From there he went to Clarke County, Iowa, living there one season, and in December, 1875, returned to Ringgold County and settled on his farm in Union Township where he has since followed agricultural pursuits.  His farm contains 160 acres of well-improved land under a high state of cultivation, with good residence and fine farm buildings.

Mr. Boggs and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church.  In politics he is identified with the Republican party.  He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, belonging to Topaz Lodge, No 438 at Kellerton.


JAMES BUCHANAN BOGGS (1828-1903) is buried in Hope Cemetery in Galesburg with Susan C. (1838-1910)

He was master-in chancery for Knox county for 36 years. He was a longtime member of the Presbyterian church. He was born 20 October 1826 in Greencastle, Franklin county, Pennsylvania. His father was John Allison Boggs and his mother Isabella Craig. He married Susan Cornelia Weeks 5 October 1858 in Galesburg and had eight children.

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From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

JAMES BUCHANAN BOGGS.  An attorney in Galesburg, he is the son of John and Isabelle C. Boggs, natives of Pennsylvania, and was born in Green Castle, Franklin County, PA, on 20 Oct 1828.  He studied law in Chandlersburg, PA, with McGanahan and Reilly.  He came to Galesburg in June 1856, and has served as City Attorney five years.  He married Susan C. Weeks, who has borne eight children, but three of whom are living.  He is a member of the Presbyterian Church and Trustee.  A Republican in politics.

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From the 1899 Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and Knox County, Munsell Publishing Company.  [Picture provided by Jim Ferris.]

JAMES BUCHANAN BOGGS, Attorney at Law and Master in Chancery, was born in Greencastle, Franklin County, PA, October 20, 1828. His parents were John and Isabella Craig (Allison) Boggs, and were natives of Franklin County, PA.  Both the father and the mother were intelligent and painstaking people and exhibited marked traits of character. They were of Scotch-Irish ancestry and seem to have inherited the stern morality of that race.

John Boggs was a physician, and at an early age, was left fatherless. He was adopted by his mother's brother, Dr. Robert Johnson, a man of wealth and influence, and under his supervision, rose to prominence. He received his medical diploma from the University of Maryland, and for thirty years practiced medicine in his native county. In the War of 1812 he was appointed surgeon of Franklin County Volunteers, and in 1819 he married Isabella Craig, daughter of William Allison.

Dr. Robert Johnson, the adopted father of Dr. John Boggs, was a surgeon in the Revolutionary War from the beginning to the end. He was also one of the original members of the Society of Cincinnati, whose first president was George Washington.

J. B. Boggs availed himself of such opportunities for schooling in his youth as the district schools afforded. This preparation was supplemented by a thorough training at the academy. He studied law at Chambersburg PA, and in 1852, was admitted to the Bar. After leaving school, he was first engaged in teaching and afterwards took charge of the Chestnut Grove Iron Furnace. His first law practice was at Loudon and McConnellsburg. In 1856, he came to Galesburg, where has been his home ever since.

Mr. Boggs is a man of ability and of fine presence. In forming opinions, he is cautious, and is not biased by prejudicial instincts. His nature is benevolent and open, to be read of all men. To him, right doing and right living are instinctive. The places of honor that he has been called to fill have been deservedly won. He filled the office of City Attorney in 1862-65-66-67-68-69, and was elected Alderman from 1879 to 1884. He was appointed Master in Chancery in 1871 and has held the office ever since.

According to his means, he has favored every public enterprise that has been for the interest of the city of his adoption. For several years, he has been the president of the Galesburg Printing Company, and a charter member of the Homestead and Loan Association and its attorney. He belongs to the Masonic Order, though not an active member at present. He has been connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows since 1849.

Mr. Boggs is a firm believer in the tenets of the Presbyterian faith and his life has always been in harmony with that church. All its laws and ordinances are to him sacred and these he has kept blameless. His political affiliations are with the republicans. Although his time is employed principally in the Chancery Court, yet he has never failed to do his duty as a worker for the success of republican principles.

He was united in marriage at Galesburg, October 5, 1858, to Susan Cornelia Weeks, daughter of Benjamin Weeks. Eight children were born to them, three of whom are living, Isabel Allison, Elizabeth Wharton (Dunn), and Henry Hurd.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

DAVID BOHER.  A farmer, son of John and Rachel (Lewis) Boher of Pennsylvania, and was born 1 July 1835, in Summersett County, PA.  He was reared on a farm and never attended school a day in his life.  In 1847, his parents moved to Kentucky, thence to Ohio in 1848, and Mr. B. came to Knox County, IL in 1858.  He married Martha Gooch in November 1866.  Two children are the result of their union, one daughter living.  He has filled the offices of City Marshal of Farmington, IL and Road Commissioner and School Director.  P.O. Yates City.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

WILLIAM BOLDING.  He is the son of Thomas and Sally (Wayman) Bolding, the former a native of Kentucky, the latter of New York, who were in comfortable circumstances.  He was born in KY, 9 Oct 1825, and was educated in the common school.  He was of good moral character in youth.  He removed from Kentucky to Knox County.  In 1865, he went from the county and served in the rebellion.  He was a School Director in 1874.  He learned the trade of a blacksmith, and also followed the life of a farmer.  He has been quite successful and is now in moderate circumstances.  In 1875 he united with the Methodist Church of Victoria.  On 20 Oct 187_ [not printed in the book] he married Maria Wayman.  Democrat in politics.  P.O. Knoxville.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

ELEMENDER BOND.  A farmer and son of Walter and Eleanor (Moon) Bond, the former a native of Maryland and the latter of Tennessee.  He was born in Clinton Co, Ohio, on 15 Dec 1834.  He received a common school education.  He moved to Knox County 7 Sept 1852, and was married 27 Feb 1862 [no wife's name listed], and has been the parent of eleven children, of who seven are living.  He was School Director for four years and Pathmaster in Chestnut Twp.  He is a Democrat. Farming has been very satisfactory and he has been successful.  Post Office, London Mills, Fulton County.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

LEVI BOND.  He was born 9 June 1852 in Ohio.  His parents, Walter and Eleanor Bond, were natives of Maryland and Tennessee, respectively.  He was educated in the common schools of Hermon, Knox County.  His parents came to the county in 1852.  He married Sarah Drumm on 11 Nov 1875 and they had one child, died 18 May 1878.  He joined the Christian Church in 1874.  In politics a Democrat.  Post Office, Hermon.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

JACOB BOOTH, son of Isaac and Mary (Gernell) Booth, both natives of Maine; was born June 1, 1821, in Maine.  His early life was passed on the farm; received his education from the common schools; learned the trade of wagon maker; also followed other business, but changed to farming, in which he has been successful; married Melinda Housh on Sept. 17, 1844, and was again married Oct. 24, 1869, to Edith Martin; moved to Illinois, then to Iowa, returning to Knox County in 1865; was School Director for five years.  Is Republican.  P. O., Maquon.

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From the 1886 Portrait and Biographical Album of Knox County, Biographical Publishing Company, Chicago, page 460.  [Contributed by Todd Walter.]

JACOB BOOTH.  The social status of any section of the country depends largely upon those men resident within it.  Knox County has grown not only populous and pleasant to view, but she contains rare intellectual and educational advantages, and reflects credit upon those who have figured in her history.  One of the representative citizens and wealthy and successful  farmers of Maquon Township is found living on section 15, in the person of Jacob Booth, as one of her best and most important factors.

Mr. Booth came to Knox County in the spring of 1844, from Sangamon County, Ill., and soon after leaving that county made a settlement at Uniontown, Salem Township, where he carried on the joint business of blacksmith and wagon-maker for a period of 15 years.  During this time he was in Springfield two years in the same business with his brother.  His next move was made to Iowa County, Iowa, at which place he purchased a farm and remained upon it for seven years, at the end of which time he disposed of the same, and in 1855 returned to Knox County, and in Maquon Township made a purchase of 90 acres of land located on section 15, upon which he is living at the present time.  Previous to this he spent two years engaged in mercantile business in the village of Maquon, in partnership with Nelson Downey.  He has improved his farm by the erection of a desirable residence and suitable out-buildings and barns, and by additional purchase has become the owner of 200 acres of highly improved and cultivated land.  Jacob Booth was born in Maine June 1, 1821.  When he had attained the age of fifteen years, he emigrated with his parents to Licking County, Ohio, remaining their until his removal to Sangamon County, Ill., in 1839.  In the latter county he followed the trade of wagon-maker and blacksmith.  In Haw Creek Township, Oct. 29, 1844, our subject was married to Miss Melinda Housh [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a Jacob Booth marrying a Malinda Housh in Knox County on September 19, 1844], the daughter of George P. and Betsie Housh.  Miss Housh was born in Washington County, Ind., and on June 9, 1859, she died in Maquon Township.

Oct. 29, 1869, our subject was again united in marriage, this time with Edith Martin [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a Jacob Booth marrying a Edith Martin in Knox County on October 24, 1869], daughter of Martin and Lucinda (Childress) Martin, natives of Virginia.  The father of Mrs. Booth died at St. Joseph, Mo., Sept. 16, 1844.  His widow still survives him, and is residing with her daughter, Mrs. B. of this notice, at the advanced age of 82 years; she was born in 1804.  Mrs. Booth was born in Green County, Ky., Feb. 20, 1837, and is the seventh in order of birth in a family of ten children.  Our subject and wife have adopted a child who bears the name of Frank.  Mr. B. is the incumbent of the office of School Director, and politically advocates the principals of the Republican party.

The parents of our subject are Isaac and Mary (Grinnell) Booth, natives of Penobscot, Me., at which place the mother died April 12, 1836.  The father afterward came to Ohio, and subsequently to Sangamon County, Ill., where his death occurred April 30, 1852.  The result of their union was the birth of 12 children, of whom Mr. Booth was the fifth in the order of birth.

A view of the comfortable home of Mr. Booth is given in this volume.

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From the 1899 Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and Knox County, Munsell Publishing Company, page 948.  [Contributed by Todd Walter.]

JACOB BOOTH; Maquon, Knox County, Illinois; was born in Penobscot County, Maine, June 1, 1821.  He was the son of Isaac and Mary Booth.  Isaac Booth was born July 7, 1792, and married Mary Grinnell December 6, 1812.  Mary Grinnell was born April 30, 1795.  He died April 30, 1852; and his wife, April 12, 1836.  She was the daughter of Royl Grinnell, a Revolutionary soldier, under General Hull.  Jacob Booth came to Sangamon County, Illinois, in 1839, and to Knox County, in 1844.  He was married to Malinda Housh, daughter of George P. Housh, September 19, 1844.  Malinda Booth was born March 17, 1821, and died June 9, 1869 (sic, 1859).  Jacob Booth's second marriage was to Edith Martin, of Galesburg, Illinois, October 24, 1869.  She was the daughter of Martin and Lucinda Martin.  Mr. Martin died in St. Joseph, Missouri, in 1844.  Mrs. Martin died in 1898, aged nearly ninety five years.  Mr. and Mrs. Booth have one adopted son, Frank Booth, of Abingdon, Illinois.  Mr. Booth is a republican, and cast his first vote for Henry Clay in 1844.  He and his wife are Christian Scientists, and are members of the mother church in Boston; and also members of the branch church at Maquon, Illinois, and were students of Mrs. Janet T. Colman, one of Mrs. Mary Baker G. Eddy's loyal students.  Mr. and Mrs. Booth are faithful workers in the cause of Christian Science.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

REV. JOHN F. BORG.  He is pastor of Lutheran Church, Knoxville and was born in Sweden 13 Dec 1849, the son of G. A. and Grata (Johnson) Borg, natives of Sweden.  He came to Galesburg in 1869.  He was reared on a farm and finished his education at Augustana College, Rock Island, IL, and chose the ministry.  He was married 28 Jun 1878 to Miss. M. Clay Anderson.  He is a Republican.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

JACOB BOWENS.  He was born 11 Apr 1816 in Frankfort, Ohio, the son of Solomon and Elizabeth (Bush) Bowens, natives of Virginia.  He was educated in the old log school-house in Indiana.  He has been Road Commissioner and School Director in Schuyler County, where he moved in 1854.  He came to Ontario in 1865.  He was married 2 Jun 1842 to Esther Hadley of Indiana, and 2 Aug 1855 to Zelinda Fuller.  He had six boys by the first wife, and three girls and one boy by the second.  He joined the M. E. Church in 1843, and has been Steward and Class-leader.  He is a Republican.  Post office, Ontario.


From the 1883 History of the State Of Kansas by William G. Cutler, published by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, Ill.  [Contributed by Todd Walter.]

D. C. BOWERSOX, farmer, P. O. Belleville, Kan., was born in Carroll County, Md., in 1844.  Soon  after, his parents removed to Adams County, Pa., remaining there until 1853.  From there went to  Montgomery County, Ohio, remaining there eighteen months, thence to Darke County, remaining until 1863, when he enlisted in the National State Guards, serving about one year.  Then enlisted in the One Hundred and Fifty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, serving about five months.

In 1867 emigrated to Illinois, locating in Knox County, and engaged in farming until 1871, when he came to Kansas and took a homestead on Section 21, Township 3, Range 3, Republic County, Kan.  Has sixty-five acres under the plow, twenty acres of pasture and the balance hay land; has four acres of timber, a good orchard of about 400 peach trees and a number of apple, pear, cherry and plum trees, and other small fruits.  Engaged in raising stock for the past four years, meeting with good success.

He was married in 1868, in Darke County, Ohio, to Miss Sarah A. Ream, of that place.  They have one son, Elmer, born in 1873.

Mr. Bowersox was Town Trustee and Assessor, and for four years was Constable besides school officer.  Is a member of John Brown Post No. 44, G. A. R.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

JOSEPH BOWHAY.  He is a farmer, son of William and Mary Bowhay, the former of England and the latter of Ireland.  He was born in Pennsylvania in 1825. His early life was passed on a farm and his education was obtained in the common schools.  He came from PA to Illinois, and settled in Knox County in 1855.  He married Elizabeth Householder.  He has filled the offices of School Director and Road Commissioner.  He is a Democrat in politics.  Post Office, Yates City.


From the 1899 Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and Knox County, Munsell Publishing Company.  [Picture provided by Jim Ferris.]

AARON BOYER was born in York County, Pennsylvania, February 17, 1833. In 1839, he moved with his parents, Daniel and Rosana Boyer, to Indiana, where he attended the district school until twelve years of age, obtaining only a meager education. About this time, he met with an accident, with eventually caused his total blindness. However, as soon as he was able to labor, his parents being poor, he was obliged to assist his father in the distillery business, in which he soon became proficient. At the age of fifteen, his father sent him from home to superintend a distillery for an acquaintance. His labor here was too great for his strength and education. Besides, the making of whiskey was distasteful and repulsive. After remaining eight months, he returned home, asking God's help to keep him from such an unworthy occupation. This resolution was the cause of his leaving home and starting out to make his own way in the world. After many unsuccessful efforts to obtain work, he was finally employed for the season by the Miami Canal Packet Company (J. A. Garfield being at the same time an employee of this company), in driving a team on a canal packet. In the Fall of 1849, he was so badly crippled with rheumatism that he had to seek other employment. It was while thus disabled that he learned to make brooms.

In 1850, he was engaged with a surveying party on the Cincinnati, Hamilton and Dayton Railroad, which was the second railroad running out of Cincinnati OH. But the inclement weather so aggravated his rheumatism and affected his eyes, which had never recovered their strength, that he was forced to give up all kinds of labor. At the age of seventeen, he became totally blind. But this boy's ambition could not be overcome, even by so great a calamity as this. He began making brooms at East Germantown IN, where his parents then lived. In a short time, he had become so proficient in this work that he was appointed foreman of the broom shops at the School for the Blind at Indianapolis, where he remained for one year.

In 1853, he married Elizabeth Buck. To them was born one son, who died in infancy, the mother dying soon after. October 3, 1858, he married Sarah Harper in Wayne County IN, where from 1855 to 1864, he was engaged in the manufacture of brooms, his first purchase of broom corn aggregating but five dollars, he obtaining credit for two dollars of this amount. He then moved to Crawford County IL, where he carried on the same business, until he came to Elmwood IL in 1866. In 1868, he went to Galesburg, locating in a small frame dwelling house with a factory fifteen by thirty feet. From this small beginning, has grown up a large and successful business, which he carried on until 1897, when he leased his plant and is now retired. In 1893 he bought about twelve thousand dollars worth of broom corn within thirty-six hours time.

Mr. Boyer, by his indomitable perseverance, transformed his little broom shop into a large manufactory, making from 15,000 to 18,000 dozen brooms annually. He has also invented and patented some useful broom machinery. Twice his factory has been destroyed by fire - once with no insurance. The present factory was built in 1882, and is sixty by ninety feet, two stories high. It is filled with the latest and most improved machinery. He has also built a fine brick residence with all modern improvements.

Mr. Boyer's second wife died in 1875, leaving three sons and one daughter, Charles H., Andrew J., William R., and Ola B.

July 10, 1877, he married Julie E., daughter of John and Bethan (Lee) Mitchell, who were among the early settlers of Galesburg, coming from New York, about 1840. By this marriage, Mr. Boyer has had four children - one son and daughter dying in infancy. The two sons now living are Abel and Orrin E.

Mr. Boyer is an active member of the Methodist Church and during his long business career, has earned himself the friendship and respect of all with whom he has come in contact, either in business or in a social way.


From the 1886 Portrait and Biographical Album of Knox County, Biographical Publishing Company, Chicago.  [Contributed by Todd Walter.]

JOSHUA B. BOYNTON, one of the prominent and successful merchants of Maquon and Supervisor of Maquon Township, came to Knox County in the fall of 1866 from Fort Wayne, Ind.  For one year after his arrival he resided in Orange Township, where he was engaged in farming.  Subsequently he removed to Haw Creek Township and there followed agriculture.  In 1869 he came to Maquon and was engaged in the butcher business in that place for one year.  Soon afterward he formed a partnership with G. G. Shearer for the purpose of carrying on the grocery business, under the firm name of Shearer & Boynton.  This partnership existed for one year, when Mr. B. bought out the interest of his partner and conducted the trade alone until 1877.  He then formed a partnership with William Swigart, and since that time the business has been carried on under the style of Swigart & Boynton.  They do an average business of $20,000 annually.

Mr. Boynton was born in Augusta, Me., June 4, 1828.  He was but a lad of five years when his parents moved to Lorain County, Ohio, where Mr. Boynton spent the early years of his life.  He had received but a limited education, and assisted his father, who was a merchant, in the store.  In 1865 Mr. Boynton came to Ft. Wayne, Ind., but was engaged in no regular business until his arrival in Knox County, in 1867.

The marriage of Mr. Boynton was solemnized at Maquon, in September, 1870, at which time he was united with Miss Rachel Bull [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a Joshua B. Boyington marrying a Rachel Bull in Knox County September 15, 1870], daughter of Walter and Betsey (Bull) Bull, natives of Maryland.  The parents resided for a number of years in Ohio prior to their coming to Knox County.  They both died in Haw Creek Township.

The wife of our subject was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, in the year 1842.  Mr. and Mrs. Boynton have had born to them six children, five of whom survive.  The record is as follows: Harriet Nay, born in 1872; Elizabeth Ann, 1874; William Walter, 1876; Emma Josephine, 1878; Edna Estelle, 1880; Sarah Isabella, 1885.  William died at the age of two years.

Mr. Boynton was elected Supervisor of Maquon Township in the spring of 1881, and has been the incumbent of that office up to the present time, filling the same with credit to himself and satisfaction to the community.  He has also been Township Treasurer and Trustee for several years and School Director for six years.  He was one of the number who enlisted in the Home Guards and was in the Morgan Raid in Ohio.  Politically he is a supporter of the principals advocated by the Republican party.

The parents of our subject were Daniel T. and Harriet O. (Laughton) Boynton, natives of Maine.  The father was of Irish and the mother of English ancestry.  The grandfather of our subject was in the War of 1812.  The parents of Mr. Boynton removed to Ohio, and thence to Fort Wayne, Ind., at which place the mother died.  The father still survives and is a resident of Kansas.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

JAMES J.  BRADBURY.  An artist, he is the son of Benjamin and Hannah A. (Stevens) Bradbury, the former of Ohio and the latter of Illinois.  He was born in Knox County, Indian Point Twp, 17 Apr 1848.  He was educated at Abingdon College.  He married 20 Jul 1869 to Belle S. McKinnie, who have borne him one child. he has studied art from childhood and is occupied at his chosen calling now in Abingdon, where for the last few years he has been a Professor in Hedding College teaching drawing and painting.  He has been very successful in enlarging pictures.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

E. HBRADFIELD.  A farmer, he is the son of E. H. and M. A. Bradfield, and was born in England in 1828. He was educated in common schools.  His early life was spent in market gardening; later, spent four years in lithographing, and some time in the wholesale grocery business.  He came to Illinois in 1854, and married Mary Crandel in 1862.  He has six children.  A Republican.  P. O. Elba Center.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

HARVEY N. BRADFORD.  A farmer, he was born 27 Sept 1809, the son of Charles and Elizabeth (Brown) Bradford, the former a native of New Hampshire, and the latter of Maine. He was educated in the common schools.  His early life was passed on the farm.  He learned the tanner's trade but gave it up for farming.  He removed from Maine to Ohio, thence to Knox County.  He married Hester Whitter 24 Oct 1836.  They have been the parents of nine children, of whom six are now living.  He has been very successful in business and well prospered.  He is a Republican.  Post Office, Gilson.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

WINSLOW W. BRADFORD.  He is the son of Wm. S. and Nancy (Youngs) Bradford, both natives of Ohio.  He was born in Persifer Twp, Knox County 13 Aug 1843.  His early life was passed on the farm, and he received his education from the common schools.  He was drummer in Co. H, 102nd Illinois Infantry. On April 26, 1866 he married Victoria S. Beck.  They have been the parents of seven children, of whom five are now living.  He removed from Knox County to Galena, IL, but returned.  He has held the offices of Township Clerk and Road Commissioner in 1869 and 1872.  In 1870, he joined the church of the United Brethren of which he was Trustee and Treasurer in 1871.  He has been very much prospered as a farmer.  He is a Republican.  Post Office Knoxville.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

EDWIN BRAINARD.  He was born in Oneida County, N.Y. 9 Nov 1809.  His father, Jeptha Brainard was a native of Connecticut, his mother Catherine Brainard was a native of Massachusetts.  Edwin received an academic education at Whitestown, NY, and chose the life of a farmer.  He served in the militia.  He married Mercy White 21 Dec 1842, four children being the fruits of the marriage.  He came to Oneida in 1855, where he now lives, still pursuing his chosen occupation of farmer.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

JEPTHA BRAINARD.  He is the son of Jeptha and Catherine (Comstock) Brainard, the former of Connecticut, the latter of Massachusetts.  He was born in western Oneida County, NY, on 17 March 1822, and came to Ontario Twp., this county where he now lives, in 1860.  He was educated in common schools and at the Liberal Institute, New York.  He was raised as a farmer and has continued that occupation ever since.  Post Office, Oneida.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

CHARLES BRECHWALD.  A liquor dealer in Galesburg, he was born at Klein, Winterheim, Germany and is the son of Michael and Margaret (Fleck) Brechwald.  He came to the United States in1853 and to Galesburg in 1856.  In 1863, he engaged in the retail liquor trade and in 1872 in the wholesale trade.  He was married 2 Apr 1854 to Barbara Waltz and is the parent of seven children, two of whom are dead.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

SAMUEL BRIDSON.  He is a farmer, and was born on the Isle of Man, 23 Dec 1827, the son of John and Margaret (Tier) Bridson, both natives of the Isle of Man.  His education was confined to a few months in a common school.  He emigrated from his native country to New York, and thence to Knox County in 1853.  On 2 April 1851, he married Dolly Cole by whom he has two sons and one daughter.  Farming has been the occupation of his choice.  He is a Republican.  Post Office, Hermon.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

BENJAMIN BRILELY.  A farmer, he was born in Clermont County, Ohio on 22 Feb 1825, the son of Samuel and Catharine (McGarvey) Briley, the former a native of Delaware and the latter of Ohio.  His early life was passed on the farm and he was educated in the common schools.  He moved to Knox County on 31 Mar 1862.  He was married 4 Mar 1851 to Cassandra Smiser.  They are the parents of eleven children.  He is a Democrat, and was Road Commisioner in Ohio six years, and six years here. He united with Christian Church in 1870.  P. O. Hermon.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

RICHARD BRISTOL.  He is the son of Rachard and Lucy (Edgerton) Bristol of New York., and was born in Wyoming County on 20 Aug 1818.  He married Laura J. Smith on 8 Oct 1845, and one boy and one girl has blessed the union.  He learned the trade of carriage maker and trimmer.  He moved to Oneida where he now lives, in 1855.


From the 1890 Portrait and Biographical Album of Washington, Clay, and Riley Counties, Kansas, by Chapman Bros.  [Contributed by Todd Walter.]

ANDREW PHILLIP BRODEN (born Anders Anderson, son of Anders).  The attention of the passing traveler is invariably attracted by the beautiful country home of this gentleman, which is located in Sherman Township, Clay County, and which, tastefully furnished without and cozily furnished within, reflects great credit upon the master hand that contrived it.  The residence is commodious and conveniently arranged, adapted to the wants of a large family and surrounded by a well-kept lawn, while in the rear are the granaries, a good, large barn, corn cribs, poultry house and other outbuildings that contribute to the material property of a farm and a farmer.  The estate is neatly fenced, chiefly with hedge and wire, while the homestead is subdivided into nine lots for the stock, of which he feeds quite a number, making a specialty of hogs and cattle, though he also owns some good horses.

Mr. Broden  is the son of Andrew and Christina Broden, who were residents of the county of Bollnas in the northwestern part of Sweden, where their son, our subject, was born, on the 24th of June, 1830.  He was reared in the faith of the Lutheran Church, to which organization his parents adhered, and likewise their progenitors as far as known.

In 1853, Andrew determined to emigrate to America.  Accordingly in the fall of that year he set sail from the harbor of Christiana, the capital of Sweden, on a sailing vessel, which soon became disabled and drifted by the wind, while the crew gazed helplessly around, unable to manage or guide it.  After a time, it floated to the vicinity of Londonderry, Ireland, where passengers were transferred to a steamer which conveyed them to Liverpool, whence they took passage by packet ship for New York.  In that city they landed in safety, and our subject then proceeded to Victoria, Illinois, where he arrived eighteen weeks after he had embarked at Christiana.  Upon his arrival his worldly possession consisted of only $1, which amount he owed to a man who accompanied him.

Our subject experienced little or no difficulty in securing labor on a farm, where he worked by the day for a short period, and afterward was employed by a railroad in Illinois; in Iowa he engaged until the spring of 1854 in chopping wood.  Returning to Illinois he was again a railroad employee during the summer months, and in the winter was a teamster and drove a coal wagon.  The summer of 1855 found him employed on a farm, while his varied fortunes led him the ensuing year to labor in a coal mine.

In the spring of 1859 our subject started out with a party of men for Pike's Peak, but only proceeded as far as Ft. Kearney, Nebraska; then turning backward they stopped for a time in St. Joseph, Missouri, where Mr. Broden worked on a farm until the following autumn.  He did not, however, remain in the West but retraced his steps to his former home in Illinois, where he was a miner until 1862.

In the meantime, the great national conflict was exciting popular feeling, and even foreigners joined in the warfare with an enthusiasm and determination second not even to that felt by native-born citizens.  Sharing the excitement of the day, Mr. Broden, August 14, 1962, enlisted in Company I, 102nd Illinois Infantry, in which he served two years and a half.  When participating in the Battle of Resaca he was wounded in the right foot by a gunshot, and on this account was discharged February 7, 1865.  After the cessation of hostilities, he returned to Knox County, Illinois, which was his home until June, 1869.  Not being entirely satisfied with prospects in Illinois, he determined to seek a home in the growing West, and accordingly, in that year, he came to Kansas and homesteaded eighty acres of his present farm, and later gained possession of another 80-acre tract of land on his soldier right.  He has since purchased 160 additional acres, so that he now owns 320 acres in this farm, all being fertile and yielding bountiful harvests to the careful labor of the husbandman.

His first residence was a log cabin, which he bought in Clay Center and hauled up to his farm, in which he lived for three years; finding it lonely, however, he persuaded Miss Ann Edling, a native of Sweden to share it with him.  They were united in marriage August 13, 1871, and she has been his faithful helpmate ever since.  Mrs. Broden was a resident of an adjoining county in Sweden to that in which our subject was reared, and was a member of the Lutheran Church.  A few years after their marriage Mr. Broden built a frame addition to the log cabin, and this was their home until the summer of 1886.  Then feeling the necessity of a more commodious and convenient residence he erected his present large and attractive home, it being one of the finest in the township.  Their family consists of eight children, namely: Edward, Anna Albertina, John P. William P. Mattie, Minnie, Mabel and Alex.  All are living and are receiving the benefits of good, practical educations.  They are regular attendants of the Methodist Church and Sunday-school, in which our subject is one of the Trustees.  He has been an efficient member of the School Board of his district during almost all the period of his residence here, and politically votes with the Republican party.  As a man of untiring energy, perseverance, benevolence and devotion to his family, Mr. Broden merits and receives the respect of the entire community.


From the 1883 William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas - Bourbon County, published by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.  [Contributed by Bob Miller.]

IRA D. BRONSON came to Kansas in March, 1857, and located at Paris, Linn County.  He remained there and in that vicinity until 1866; with the exception of the period during which he was in the army, was engaged in the lumber business.  In May, 1861, he enlisted as a private in Company F, Second Kansas Volunteer Infantry.  He was in all the engagements of his command, being present at the battles of Wilson's Creek, Prairie Grove, Old Fort Wayne and Cane Hill, and in many engagements in Missouri, Arkansas and the Indian Territory, and was mustered out of service in the fall of 1865, as Captain of Company I, Second Arkansas Volunteer Infantry, having also served as Captain of Company A, and commanding Fourth Arkansas Infantry Regiment.  In March, 1866, he removed to Mound City, remaining there until August 1, 1870, when he came to Fort Scott, and accepted the position of Clerk of the District Court, a position he retained until January, 1881.  He became connected with the St. Louis, Fort Scott, Wichita Railroad Company, February 23, 1880, in the capacity of Stockholder, Director, Secretary and Treasurer and Builder, a connection which continued until March 10, 1882.  He has since been engaged in buying timber land in Oregon, Ozark, Douglas and Howell Counties, Mo., and in Fulton County Ark., and is also interested in the towns of Marmaton, Redfield, Bronson, Moran, La Harpe, Iola, Lilly and Toronto, Kan.  Is a member of Gilfillan Flag Stone Company and St. Louis Flag Stone Company.  He is a native of Warren, Herkimer Co., N. Y., born October 24, 1835.  When nineteen years of age, he came to Illinois and taught school in Knox County, and near Antioch, Lake County.  He was married in Antioch, Lake Co., Ill., June 11, 1867, to Miss Annie Webb, a native of that place.  They have five children - Ira H., Lucy A., Charles W., Elizabeth and Anna J.  He is a member of the A., F. & A. M., Knights Templar, the A. O. U. W. and the G. A. R.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

AARON B. BROWN.  He is a farmer, and was born in Cortland County NY on 18 Dec 1831. His parents were William and Eunice (Kinney) Brown.  They were both born in New York State.  He was educated in the common schools.  His parents moved west to Cook County, IL, in Oct 1843, thence to Knox County in 1853.  He settled in Oneida Twp., and has held the offices of School Director and Justice of the Peace for a number of years.  On 8 Oct 1854, he married Alvira Buck, formerly of Jefferson, NY.  They have one son.  He has been a member of the Universalist Church for ten years and is a Trustee.  Post Office, Oneida.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

BENJAMIN F. BROWN, M.D., was born in Troupsburg, Steuben county, N.Y., on March 5, 1839.  He was educated at Troupsburg Academy; studied medicine three years with Dr. McFarling, and graduated from the Albany Medical College, N.Y.  He was Alderman two years in the city of Oneida.  Dr. Brown was Assistant Surgeon three years during the rebellion; he was married on Nov. 20, 1866, to Jennie McCornack, has five children, all boys.  He is a member of the M. E. Church; held the office of Steward for the past five years.  Political views, Republican. Postoffice, Oneida.

*  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

[Contributed by Patti Smith.]

Benjamin F. Brown (60258 bytes)Benjamin was the son of Joseph Brown and Sally Bartle of Troupsburg, NY.  He began his study of medicine at 19 years of age.  When the Civil War started he enlisted in the army where he was assigned as the hospital steward in the Washington, DC area for 3 years.  He served as a Assistant Surgeon at the Trinity Church Hospital in Georgetown and the Judiciary Square Hospital in Washington, DC.  Later he was promoted to the Office of Surgeon, US Navy, where he served for one year and was honorably discharged.  After the Civil war, B. F. enrolled in the Albany Medical College (NY) and attended the third course of lectures and graduated with honors.  B. F. declined the invitation of his friends to follow his profession near his home town.  He left NY in 1866 and moved to Oneida in Knox Co, IL.  There he established a medical practice which he maintained until his death 13 years later.

Reported in Oneida News:  Alderman in Oneida, IL for 2 years.  Farm was located west of Oneida on Pilot Knob.

Benjamin and Jennie's children were: 

3 sons of Benjamin F. Brown (61303 bytes)Edwin Watson who became a prominent farmers in Mitchell, NE , raising pedigreed hogs and cattle.  He was the owner of a famous boar which was the prize winner at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893.

Eli who died in 1888.

Mark Hamilton who died in 1887.

Charles McCornack was a elevator operator and farmer.  He grew to manhood in the Oneida community and engaged in farming.  For 16 years he operated a grain elevator at Oneida.  Then moving to Yates City, he operated an elevator there for 10 years.  He retired to reside in Galva.  Mr. Brown was twice married.  The first marriage was to Josie Pittard of Oneida, Dec. 25, 1895, and she died on May 23, 1926.  On Dec. 26, 1928, he married Florence McClure of Altona.  During his long and useful life, Mr. Brown was interested not only in his immediate business but in civic affairs generally.  While in Oneida he served as a director of the Oneida High school board.  At Yates city he served on the grade school board and was also a director of the Salem-Elba Fire Protection district.  He was a very public spirited citizen, supporting all meritorious community endeavors.  He was a member of the Ontario Congregational church.

Jennie was the daughter of Robert McCornack and Jane Gordon McDowell emigrants to Knox County from Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland.  Jennie died in Feb. 1878 and Benjamin married Jeanie Ross daughter of David Ross & Sarah McCreadie.

Benjamin died suddenly in April 1879 and the 5 brothers were left as orphans in the care of their pregnant step-mother and her (Jennie's) brother John McCornack as the guardian.  After John died on May 20 1885 , Andrew McCornack and Andrew Anderson (relation?)(Jennie's stepmother was a Anderson) were named guardians.  The brothers and their half-sister lived with Jeannie Ross Brown.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

GEORGE W. BROWN.  He is the inventor of "Brown's Corn-Planter" and proprietor of the extensive corn-planter works located at Galesburg, and was born in Saratoga County, NY on 29 Oct 1815.  He remained upon the farm where he was born until he was 14 years old, when he learned the carpenter's trade in which he worked many years.  In July 1836, he came to Galesburg being one of the earliest settlers in this section.  Previous to coming west, he was married on 1 Sept 1835 to Maria Terpening.  They did not live in the lap of luxury but were hardworking pioneers and he earned a living by farming and working at his trade.  Many houses in the county were erected by him.  On his arrival in Warren County, he traded his team for a piece of land and went to farming, he had a log house to build for himself, and his neighbors needed his mechanical services.  In 1848, Mr. B. conceived the idea of turning a cultivator into a corn-planter.  He saw the great need for a machine that would plant the grain which was so universally cultivated in Illinois.  Nature had gifted him with faculties of genius of superior quality and with untiring energy and perseverance he labored on until he gave to the civilized world one of the most useful implements ever invented. [There is a lengthy sketch about the Brown's Corn-Planter in the book.]  He was a member of the M. E. Church in Galesburg.  He is the father of three children, one son and two daughters: James E., born 12 Apr 1837 who is associated with his father in the corn-planter business; Elizabeth A. born 21 Mar 1839, the wife of Mr. T. L. Perrin, a banker in Creston, Iowa; and Sarah J., b. 12 Jun 1844, the wife of W. S. Cowan, a merchant in Galesburg.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

HARMON G. BROWN.  He is a son of Samuel and Henrietta (Hobbs) Brown and was born in Nelson County, KY, on 20 Dec 1803.  His father was a native of PA, and his mother of Kentucky.  He was educated in a private school in Kentucky, and brought up on a farm.  He came to Knox County in 1831 and located on the farm where he now lives, in 1832.  He participated in the Black Hawk War and was elected Justice of the Peace, but declined to serve.  He was married to Nancy Hogan, 1 Sept 1840 who has borne him twelve children, of whom six sons and two daughters are now living.  He is a member of the M. E. Church, and a Republican in politics.  P.O. Galesburg.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

JAMES HARVEY BROWN.  He is the son of James and Polly (Baker) Brown, and was born in Clinton, Ohio on 4 Sept 1823.  He was educated in common schools and reared on the farm which he continued to follow.  He married in Nov. 1846 to Lyda L. Barnes who bore him seven children, five of whom now live.  He joined the Christian Church in 1855 and has been Deacon for several years.  He is Democratic in politics.  Post Office St. Augustine.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

JOHN V. BROWN.  He is the son of Andrew J. Brown whose nativity is Jackson County, Ohio, and Mary A. (Ferguson) Brown, who was born in Hart County, KY.  John V. Brown was born on 23 April 1844 and has always been a farmer from choice.  He enlisted in Company D, 7th Illinois Cavalry 9 Nov 1863 and served until the end of the war. He was married to Alice Harshborger on 31 Jan 1869. He joined the United Brethren Church in 1874, in which he was chosen Class-leader in 1875. Post Office, Maquon.


Taken from the 1891 Biographical History of Pottawattamie County, Iowa, The Lewis Publishing Company.  [Contributed by Todd Walter.]

OSCAR H. BROWN, one of the most prominent business men of Council Bluffs, was born near Biggsville, Henderson County, Illinois, September 28, 1855, the first born in the family of Clinton W. and Louisa (Short) Brown.  The other children were:  Fannie Alice, born May 20, 1857; Anna May, born October 31 1858, and married E. C. Brown; William R., born June 18, 1863; Elva C., born October 15, 1865; Stewart C., born January 3, 1868, and died March 26, 1889.

Mr. Clinton W. Brown was born near Gallatin, Sumner County, Tennessee, April 28, 1882, the youngest in a family of four of Reuben S. and Keziah (Sarver) Brown.  The other children were: Henry P. M., born April 8, 1824; Marian L., born March 25, 1826; Julia Ann, born July 30, 1828, and married H. W. Crossthwait; Reuben S. Brown was born in Rockingham County, Virginia, August 5, 1799, and was taken by his parents to Tennessee in their change of residence to that State, settling in Sumner County about 1822 or 1823.  He inherited no property and commenced married life without means; was Colonel of the State militia for a few years, and October 10, 1838, with all his household goods in a covered wagon, drawn by horses, he moved to Knox County, Illinois, which section of country he had previously visited, receiving favorable impressions of the fertility of the soil and congenial sentiments of the people concerning slavery; though a Southerner by birth he was a strong Abolitionist.  He was eight weeks on the journey, having to ford most of the streams and suffer many privations.  Settling at Cherry Grove, Knox County Illinois, he remained there until the fall of 1850, when he located upon a farm in the vicinity of Biggsville, Henderson County, same State.  During Grant's administration he was Postmaster at Biggsville.  In 1876 he removed to a point near Piper City, Central Illinois, where he lived until the fall of 1879, and then he came to Council Bluffs, and spent the winter with his son on C street.

In the spring of 1880 he went to Imogene, Iowa, where his daughter, Mrs. Crossthwait, had located, and where he passed the remainder of his life, dying January 21, 1890, at the advanced age of ninety-one years.

His first vote for president of the United States was cast for General Jackson in 1828, but he afterward became a Whig and supported Henry Clay.  From the time he became of age he cast his vote at every presidential election during his life.  He was a personal friend of Abraham Lincoln, and wept like a child when that great and good man was assassinated; was an ardent supporter of the Union cause during the war, and was always a strong advocate of temperance; was a zealous student of State and national politics, and a man of remarkable memory, which remained unimpaired until his death, and was generous, even to a fault, in all his dealings.  His life companion, a native of North Carolina, died only four years previously, February 2, 1886, at her daughter's home.  She was a devoted wife and mother and a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  Her death was the first that occurred in the family.

Mr. Clinton W. Brown was married September 15, 1853, but being the youngest of his father's family, he remained with his parents until the fall of 1854, when he purchased a farm near by, in what was afterward Oquawka Township, file miles from Oquawka, the county-seat of Henderson County, Illinois.  He remained there until the autumn of 1863, making many improvements and placing the land in a State of fine cultivation.  He then sold out and moved with his family to Montgomery County, Iowa, rented a farm nine miles from Red Oak, at a point now called Climax, remained there until the spring of 1870, and then removed to Pottawattamie County, buying an unimproved piece of land in Washington Township.  He erected some buildings, planted a wind-break and an orchard and made other improvements.  In March, 1877, he rented this farm and moved into the city of Council Bluffs, and owing to the poor health of his wife he never returned to the farm, which he consequently sold in 1882, buy property in the city.  Here he has been engaged in buying and selling real estate and farm machinery and in building.  He has been Justice of the Peace, Township Clerk and Treasurer of the School Board for a number of years.  Is a prohibition Republican and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which society he is a class-leader, trustee and steward.  He is a gentleman who enjoys the confidence and respect of the community in which he has been identified with all the moral, social and material interests.  His wife was born in Henderson County, Illinois, August 11, 1835, a daughter of Abner Short, who was a native of Kentucky, a pioneer of the "Prairie State," married Hirana Ewing in Indiana, and moved to Henderson County, Illinois, where he continued to reside during the remainder of his life.  Mrs. Brown was brought up a Presbyterian, but a few years before her death she united with the Methodist Episcopal Church.  She was a woman of sympathetic nature, a devoted wife and mother, and admired by all who knew her.  She died in Council Bluffs, July 20, 1870, and was buried in Fairview Cemetery.

The early life of Mr. O. H. Brown, whose name heads this biography, was spent on a farm and in school.  At the age of twenty years he began teaching school, in his native county, and continued that vocation till the spring of 1878, when he entered the employ of Harle & McKune, wholesale and retail druggists, and served two years as an apprentice without pay.  The firm then employed him as a traveling salesman for five years, and as a "knight of the grip" he was decidedly successful, though not one of the "boys."  By strict attention to business and the practice of economy he saved enough to buy out the retail department of his employers, and opened a first-class drugstore, comprising also toilet and fancy articles, at 527 Main street, his present location, and he enjoys the confidence and esteem of a large patronage.  He also owns a beautiful residence on Tenth avenue. Thus in his short business career, and while yet in the morning of life he has established a financial standing and business reputation that is indeed enviable.  The many traits of character that are essential to the establishment of friendships and a successful career in the social and business world, he possesses to a marked degree.  Step by step he has ascended the ladder of prosperity until to-day he ranks among the leading business men of the city.  In his political sympathies he affiliates with the Republican party, though he takes no active part in party councils.

September 12, 1889, he married Miss Mamie Sherlock, of Auburn, New York, a lady of many personal charms and accomplishments.  Mr. Brown is a member of the A. O. U. W., in which order he has held the responsible position of Financier for two terms.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

REV. R. A. BROWN.  He is a student at Hedding College at Abingdon. He is a prominent member of the Oliniana Society.


SAMUEL BROWN came to Rio township in 1834 from Montgomery county, Indiana. He was a justice of the peace there and county supervisor.

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From the 1899 Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and Knox County, Munsell Publishing Company.  [Picture provided by Jim Ferris.]

SAMUEL BROWN was born in Montgomery County, IN, April 23, 1826. He was the son of Samuel and Jane (Bell) Brown; the father was Scotch-Irish descent and was born in Kentucky; the mother, who was of Welsh-Irish ancestry, was a native of New Jersey; they were married in Butler County, OH, March 12, 1807; he was a soldier in the War of 1812 and drew a soldier's warrant. This worthy couple moved from Butler County, OH, to Whitewater, IN, then to Montgomery County, IN, where they lived twelve years, and from there, in the Fall of 1834, to Rio Township, Knox County, IL. The next Spring they bought land in Henderson Township (Section 6), and although there were settlers all around them, neighbors were generally three miles apart. They were both members of the Baptist Church, and Mr. Brown held the office of deacon. In politics, he was a democrat. They died in Warren County, Mr. Brown, September 10, 1856, aged seventy-four, Mrs. Brown, May 12, 1869, nearly eighty-tree years of age. They had nine children, Elizabeth, Esther, Mary, Benjamin, Allen S., Nancy, Jane, Samuel, and John. All lived to enter upon married life, except John, who died at the age of ten, but only Samuel and Benjamin are now living. The parental grandparents of Samuel Brown were John and Esther (Crossley) Brown.

Samuel Brown attended school only nine months, but nevertheless became a well-read self-educated man, one of the best informed and most intelligent in his township. It was not until after he was married that he learned to read and write, acquiring this and much other knowledge from the teachers who boarded in his family.

November 6, 1845, in Mercer County IL, Mr. Brown married Elizabeth Miller. Six children were born to them, Abraham Miller; Jacob Edward; William W.; deceased; Jennie, deceased; Nannie and Ella. Abraham M. graduated from Lombard University in 1870; he is a lawyer, having been admitted to the Bar in 1872; in 1876, he was elected to the Legislature, serving one term. Jacob Edward is a farmer and stock-raiser in Rio Township. Jennie married Milton L. Overstreet; died, 1892. Nannie is the wife of J. L. Overstreet. Ella married Nathaniel G. Scott who died in August, 1898; they had three children, Preston Brown, Notely Miller, and Mary deceased. Mrs. Scott was educated in the Galesburg High School, graduating in the class of 1877.

Mr. Brown was only twenty years old when he married and settled on his farm of 80 acres on Section 30, Rio Township. This farm he improved, and was so successful that he added to the original until the home farm now consists of over 600 acres. To his wife is due equal credit for the accumulation of this fine property. Although she was a most delicate woman, she was an excellent housekeeping and manager. In the month of August, 1870, at great sacrifice to himself, he left his prosperous farm and moved to Galesburg for the purpose of educating his children. Mr. and Mrs. Brown celebrated their Golden Wedding in 1895, one of three golden weddings in the family; it was a notable occasion.

In religion, Mr. Brown is a Universalist. In politics, he is a democrat, and has held a number of local offices, such as Justice of the Peace, which office he held for about twelve years, School Director and Trustee, Road Commissioner and Supervisor.


 

SamBrown

Samuel W. Brown

By Vince Roman

Vince Roman, Historical Research Specialist for the law firm of Stahancyk, Kent, Johnson and Hook in Vancouver, Washington has done extensive research on the Charles Brown House at 400 W. 11th Street and the Brown family. The following article concerns early Vancouver pioneer Samuel W. Brown and his impact on the City’s developing years. For more information on the Brown House and family visit www.charlesbrownhouse.com or contact Vince Roman at 360-750-9115.
Samuel W. Brown was born in 1819 in Meade County, Kentucky, the tenth child of Samuel Brown and Henrietta Hobbs. His father died when he was quite young, leaving his mother to raise eleven children. After the death of his father the family relocated to Knox County, Illinois. Sam was educated there and finished his schooling at the Knox County Academy in 1842. For the next seven years Sam endured the hardships of farm life until he was elected sheriff of Knox County in 1849. After one term as sheriff he was elected as the second mayor of Galesburg and in 1857 became a member of the Illinois State Legislature. Sam most likely met President Abraham Lincoln, who would become a personal friend, while serving in the state legislature. Sam was also involved in the 5th Lincoln-Douglas debate held in Galesburg in 1858 and was one of the founders of Lombard College. In 1861 Lincoln appointed Sam “Receiver of Public Moneys” in Vancouver, Washington Territory; in essence, the person who would be in charge of money after land was sold in the territory. Later that same year the Brown family ventured west via the Isthmus of Panama.
            The Brown Family settled in Vancouver, however the original location is unknown.  One possible first residency was the house at 400 W. 11th Street, now known as the Charles Brown House, which may date back as early as 1866.  Sam himself could very well have built the original house.  An article written by Clark Brown (no relation) appeared in the Columbian in 1946 welcoming the law offices of Bates and Burnett to the neighborhood as the first decentralized professional building in the City of Vancouver. In the article Brown gives a brief history of the house, stating Sam Brown as its builder. In addition to this article, a great-great granddaughter of Sam Brown has shared how she heard throughout the years that Sam was the builder. The house was later named after Sam’s son, and is now home to the law offices of Stahancyk, Kent, Johnson and Hook.
There is, however, conflicting evidence as to who the original builder was. A deed from 1874 shows the transfer of property from pioneer attorney Alonzo Cook to Sam’s son Charles. The house is of French Second Empire architecture, quite common and popular in the mid-late 19th century on the East Coast where Mr. Cook was from. To this day, this style of home is considerably rare on the West Coast. Perhaps Cook wanted to bring some East Coast allure to Vancouver when he came west.
            Regardless whether it was Alonzo Cook or Sam Brown who built the house that has stood for almost a century and a half, Sam Brown undoubtedly had an impact on early Vancouver development. When not acting as the Receiver of Public Moneys, Sam ventured into several other business enterprises. He owned the largest and most complete nursery north of California right here in Vancouver. He was the President of the Vancouver and Yakima railroad and Vice President of the Vancouver Transportation Company.
Having great power over much of the early Vancouver transportation system probably gave Sam the ability to execute a neighborly ploy with impudence. According to Brown descendant Liz Carpenter, Sam did not like the owner of a homestead to the west of his own property. The trolley in town was slated to run between their properties (thereby benefiting them both if they were to plat or further develop); however, Sam re-routed the trolley through his property, thus becoming the sole beneficiary of the trolley route. These trolley tracks helped lay the foundation for Vancouver’s city streets.
Sam died on January 29, 1908. His wife, Harriet, preceded him in death by 19 years.  One son survived him, Edward Lincoln Brown. Another son, Floyd, died as a child, and his third son, Charles, for whom the house is named, committed suicide in 1901 after being involved in a banking scandal.

 


 

From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

BENJAMIN BRUINGTON.  He is a farmer, the son of George and Mary Bruington, the former born in Maryland in 1776, and the latter in Pennsylvania in 1782.  Benjamin was born in Kentucky in 1810.  He was educated in the common schools and spent his early life on the farm.  At the age of 25, he came to Warren County, thence to Knox County, IL.  On 6 Dec 1836, he was married to Mary Scott of Kentucky who has borne him two sons and one daughter, all living.  He had one son, Thomas P., in the 102nd Regiment Illinois Volunteers in the late civil war.  He has filled the offices of School Director and Supervisor.  He votes the Democratic ticket.  Post Office, Galesburg.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

FRANCIS M. BRUNER.  He is the the President of Abingdon College, and is the son of Henry and Matilda (Claycomb) Bruner, of Kentucky.  He was born in Breckenridge County, KY on 28 Dec 1833.  When about one year old he moved with his parents to Warren County, IL , locating on a farm where he attended the country schools until 19 years old.  The first school he attended was three miles or more from his home.  His father attended the same school, carrying his son behind him on a horse.  President Bruner gives his father credit for giving him the best part of his education in the persevering, industrious habits which he cultivated in him under the arduous labors and trials of pioneer life.  At the age of 19, he entered Knox College where he spent 5 years and graduated in 1857.  He earned about $400 teaching, received more from his father, married and went to Germany where he spent nearly two years in the Royal University at Halle on the Sarle in Prussia.  He became proficient in the German language.  He visited Berlin, and went to Paris where he spent five months acquiring the French language and hearing lectures on botany, physiology, anatomy, zoology, anthropology etc.  He then went to London and then home, after three years absence.  On returning from Europe he labored as an evangelist for about four years and was then ordained Elder in the Christian Church in Monmouth, IL, where he preached five years, then resigned and became President of Oskaloosa College, in Oskaloosa, Iowa.  He then returned to Monmouth and preached, and 24 July 1877 he accepted the Presidency of Abingdon College.  In 1863, he he was appointed Captain of Company A, 7th US Colored Infantry, doing much service in the South.  He resigned due to ill health.  He was elected to the Legislature from Warren County in 1866 and was married to Miss Esther Lane on 1 Apr 1858, a graduate of Knox College.  He made a profession of faith in Christ at the age of 14 and united with the Christian Church.  He is a Republican.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman, page 658.  [Contributed by Todd Walter.]

HENRY BRUNER, was born in Breckenridge county, Ky., Dec. 12, 1812; his parents were Henry and Eves (Frymire) Bruner, of Kentucky.  He only attended school a few weeks, in a log house without a floor; moved to Warren county at a very early date, where he lived for some years; filled the office of Road Commissioner there; came to Galesburg in 1856; he was married Jan. 8, 1833; he has ten children, seven of whom are living.  He has been a member of the Christian Church since 1840, is now a Deacon in the congregation at Galesburg.  Mr. Bruner has been a hardworking man and very successful in life.  When he arrived in Warren county he had but 75 cents.

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From the 1899 Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and Knox County, Munsell Publishing Company, page xxx.  [Contributed by Todd Walter.]

HENRY BRUNER; Retired Farmer; Galesburg; born in 1812, in Breckenridge County, Kentucky.  He came to Warren County in 1835, to a farm nine miles west of Galesburg.  He was married to Matilda Claycomb [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a Peter Bruner marrying a Sally Claycomb in Warren County on September 20, 1838], who died in 1867.  Their children attained maturity.  Francis M., Melissa A., Adeline, Sarah, John M., Clarinda, and Julia.  Francis M. graduated from Knox College in 1857; he was President of Oskaloosa College, Iowa, from 1870 to 1876; President of Abingdon College, Illinois, from 1877 to 1885; and Professor of Sacred Literature and Exegesis in Eureka College, Illinois, from 1885 to 1887.  John M. served in the Civil War; he graduated from Knox College in 1869, and studied medicine in Berlin and Halle, Germany, and in New York.  He died April 23, 1890.  Mr. Henry Bruner came to Galesburg in 1855.  His second marriage was with Mrs. Anna Clark [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a Henry Clark marrying a Anna A. Clark in Knox County on January 25, 1877].  He is a member of the Christian Church.


Taken from1882 History of the State of Nebraska, by Andreas.  [Contributed by Bob Miller.]

AUSTIN W. BUFFUM, dealer in drugs, groceries, jewelry, Tecumseh.  Mr. Buffum was born and reared in Knox County, Ill., and came to Nebraska 1866 and took up the agricultural industry here, which he successfully followed till 1872, when he engaged at the present business.  In 1869 he was married to Miss Martha A. Simpkins, who was born and reared in Knox County, Ill.  They have a family of three sons, Stephen Benoni, Warren M. and Charles R.  Mr. Buffum served in Co. C. 83d Ill., in the Department of Topographical Engineers from 1862 till the end of the war, was honorably discharged.  He has been active in the social and political life of this locality.


Taken from the 1889 Portrait and Biographical Album of Johnson and Pawnee Counties, Nebraska, Chapman Brothers, Chicago.  [Contributed by Todd Walter.]

JUDGE JOSEPH W. BUFFUM.  The subject of this biography is widely and favorably known throughout this county as one of its most prominent and useful citizens.  He is a lifelong agriculturist, but of late years has been giving his attention to live stock, carrying on his operations at a beautiful farm and homestead of 160 acres, on section 17 in Todd Creek Precinct.

A native of Ashtabula County, Ohio, our subject was born May 9, 1834, and when three years of age went with his parents to Knox County, Ill.  They settled upon a tract of land, where the father engaged in farming, and where were spent the boyhood and youth of Joseph W., during which time he acquired a good practical education, and became familiar with the various employments of rural life.

The years of young Buffum were thus spent in a comparatively uneventful manner until the notes of civil war startled the country, and its young men began by hundreds to offer their services in defense of the Union.  On the 11th of August, 1862, our subject enlisted in Company G, 83d Illinois Infantry, which was assigned to the Army of the Cumberland.  He first saw the smoke of battle at Ft. Donelson, and was thereafter engaged in many of the important battles of the war, experiencing many hairbreadth escapes, and at Clarksville, Tenn., was wounded in the left leg, and made a cripple for life.  He has never been able to walk since that time as other men, but succeeded in getting around slowly by the aid of crutches, and for the past eight or nine years has been able to abandon their use.  This occurred in the spring of 1865.  Mr. Buffum was confined at Ft. Bruce, and after the close of the conflict received his honorable discharge at Chicago, Ill., in July, 1865, and was mustered out of the service.  His army experience was similar to that of thousands, and has been recorded in a history that will never grow old to the American people.

After being relegated to the ranks of civil life Mr. Buffum returned to his old home in Knox County, Ill., for a brief period, and entered his father's store in Yates City, where, however, he remained only a short time, until starting for the West.  He left the Prairie State on the 1st of April, 1868, and reached Nebraska twenty days later, settling in Tecumseh, where he resided for about twelve years.  While residing there he improved the land of which he had become owner before leaving Illinois. Upon this there had been no attempt at improvement, and Mr. Buffum pursued thereafter the course common to the Nebraska pioneer, battling with the difficulties of a distant market, imperfect farm implements, and the various other drawbacks which beset the new settler.  He was possessed, however, of the sturdy courage and perseverance incident to the men of those times, and allowed nothing to deter him from his purpose of building up a homestead on the soil of Nebraska.  After putting in his first crops he began planting shade and fruit trees, erecting the buildings most urgently needed, put out several acres of forest trees and a large peach orchard, and otherwise increased the value and beauty of his property.  Upon this farm, however, he did not live, making his home in Tecumseh, and in addition to the supervision of his farming operations, was engaged four years in the livery business.  Later he took up merchandising, in which he was engaged three years.  He sold this farm in the fall of 1880, and purchased his present homestead the year following.

This latter property had undergone considerable improvements, but Mr. Buffum has greatly added to its value by the erection of a large and handsome residence, which, with its surroundings, constitutes one of the most attractive pictures in the landscape of this region.  Here he has about eight acres of full grown forest trees, a fine apple orchard and trees of the smaller fruits.  His live stock includes about seventy-five head of choice Short-horn cattle, but he is working his way toward the breeding of road horses, having some fine and valuable specimens of Hambletonians.  In the care and feeding of his stock Mr. Buffum has gathered around him all the conveniences, having ample stabling, watering troughs, etc.

In addition to his extensive farming interests Judge Buffum has always been a prominent man in public affairs, filling many positions of trust and responsibility.  He was elected to the office of County Judge in the fall of 1873, and subsequently was elected County Treasurer, serving his full term with credit to himself and satisfaction to his constituents.  Democratic in politics, the fact that he holds his office in a Republican stronghold is indicative of the estimation in which he is held by the people of the county.  Almost from the time of his coming here he has been an incumbent of the local offices, a member of the School Board, etc.

One of the most important events in the life of our subject was his marriage with Miss Sarah A. Mills, which was celebrated at the home of the bride in Knox County, Ill., Feb. 28, 1856.  Of this union there have been born seven children, five of whom are living, namely: Esther Estelle, Clara Belle, Martha Lodema, Lou and Josephine.  With the exception of the eldest daughter they are all at home with their parents.  Esther E. is the wife of Mr. J. E. Davis, of Grafton, Neb., and the mother of one child, a daughter, Carrie L.  The children of our subject have been given a thorough education, and are bright and intelligent, doing honor to their ancestry and parental training.

Mrs. Sarah A. (Mills) Buffum was born near Columbus, Ohio, Jan. 17, 1838, and lived there until reaching womanhood.  She then removed to Illinois with her parents.  The latter were John and Tempa (Hatch) Mills, and the father was a native of Vermont, and a farmer by occupation.  He spent his last years in Knox County, Ill., dying in 1858, at the advanced age of sixty-three years.  The mother had passed away when her daughter Sarah A. was but a child, in Madison County, Ohio.

Stephen Smith Buffum, the father of our subject, was born in Vermont, Oct. 22, 1802.  He left the Green Mountain State early in life, migrating to New York, and when about fifteen or sixteen years old sought the Far West.  Ashtabula County, Ohio, at that time came under this description, and young Buffum, taking up a tract of land which was covered with timber, felled the trees and built up for himself a good homestead.  He married Miss Esther Mann, of Ashtabula County, and they became the parents of six sons and two daughters, seven of whom lived to mature years.  In 1836 he left Ohio, and settled among the pioneers of Knox County, Ill., being the third family in Salem Township.  There again he proceeded as before, eliminating a homestead from the wilderness, although he had prairie land to work upon instead of timber.  His first purchase was 160 acres, to which he subsequently added a like amount, becoming owner of half a section.  Here he lived and labored until quite well advanced in years, then, in 1860, sold out and removed to Yates City, where he engaged first in the grain trade and later in general merchandising.  He was a hale, hearty and intelligent old gentleman, and died in February, 1871, at the age of about sixty-nine years.

Mrs. Esther (Mann) Buffum died in October, 1845, and the father of our subject was then married to Miss Diantha L. Atwood, who is now in Yates City, Ill.  He was prominent in local affairs in Illinois, holding the offices of Supervisor and Justice of the Peace for many years, and in the Masonic fraternity was a Knight Templar, high in the order. Religiously, he was a Universalist in belief during the later years of his life, although when in Ohio he attended the Episcopal Church, walking six miles to and from the house of worship.

The grandfather of our subject, also Stephen Buffum by name, was a native of Vermont, and settled in Fulton County, Ill., fully as early if not earlier than 1830.  He was married in Vermont, and reared a large family.  He was one of the earliest pioneers of that region, and acquired a good property. He spent his last days among his children, and had a sufficient income to maintain him comfortably.  His death took place between 1850 and 1860, after he had reached the advanced age of eighty-four years.  He served with one of his sons in the Black Hawk War.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

MATTHEW BUFFUM.  A farmer, the son of Stephen and Esther Buffum, the former a native of Vermont, the latter of Ohio.  He was born in Ohio on 31 Nov 1820.  He grew up on a farm and obtained his education in a log school-house.  He left Ohio and came to Knox County in 1837.  He married Lidia J. Jobes.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

JOHN ADAMS BULKLEY.  A photographer in Galesburg, he is the son of A. W. and Margaret A. (Coenhoven) Bulkley, the former of Connecticut and the latter of New York City.  He was born in Caunon, IL, on 23 Sept 1842, reared on a farm and served the the late war for three years in Company I., 102nd Illinois Infantry.  He came to Galesburg in 1871.  He was married 23 Sep 1782 to Emma H. Copley and has one son.  He joined the M. E. Church in 1872.  In politics he is a Democrat.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

DWIGHT W. BUNKER.  He is a merchant, son of Samuel and Silvia (Walton) Bunker, and was born 4 Nov 1846 in Lake County, Ohio.  He enlisted in Company K, 45th Illinois Infantry on 20 Oct 1861.  He was wounded at the battle of Shiloh, and was left on the field to die.  He so far recovered that he walked from the battlefield to the river where he remained for seven days in an old tent, upon wet straw without blankets or covering, his wounds not being dressed.  From 1864 to 1873, he was engaged in railroad building, served as County Clerk of Harvey County, Kansas, came to Galesburg and embarked in the boot and shoe trade in June 1874.  He married Mary Bell Carpenter, who has borne him one son.   He is a Republican.

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From the 1899 Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and Knox County, Munsell Publishing Company.  [Picture provided by Jim Ferris.]

DWIGHT W. BUNKER was born November 4, 1846, in Mentor, OH. He was the son of Samuel and Silvia (Walton) Bunker and received from them great care and instruction during his boyhood years. He was educated in the common schools, and from them acquired that mental discipline which fitted him for the business of life. When only two years of age, his parents came to Henderson IL, where they spent the remainder of their days. Young Bunker had a strong desire to be a soldier, and when only fourteen years old he enlisted at Wataga in Company K., Forty-first Illinois Volunteers, known as the "Lead Mine Regiment", October 20, 1861. He belonged to Captain B. F. Holcomb's Company and was its youngest member. He was at the capture of Forts Henry and Donaldson, and saw the stars and stripes planted in triumph on their heights. He fought at the bloody battle of Shiloh, and was terribly wounded there while standing near the color-bearer. His left arm was shattered, his left side was lacerated, and a bullet struck his shoulder, which was never removed. He was left, as though dead, on the field of battle. But life was not wholly extinct, and he was removed to a tent where he remained several days without even the covering of a blanket. For six weeks he lay in the death-ward of the hospital, looking at the ghastly forms of the dead and dying around him, with scarcely a ray of hope of recovery. His father, learning of his condition, removed him to his home, and thereby, probably, saved his life. These frightful wounds were the cause of his early death, and it may be truly said that Dwight W. Bunker died for his country.

As soon as he had sufficiently recovered, he was anxious to engage in business. From 1864 to 1873, he was employed on the Union Pacific Railroad. At the close of his service with this company, he engaged in trade for himself, opening a shoe store on Main Street in Galesburg. This business he conducted with success until this death.

Dwight W. Bunker was an excellent citizen. He was patriotic, loving, and kind, and discharged every obligation not grudgingly, but cheerfully. He was benevolent and charitable according to his means, and was no laggard in the performance of good deeds. In every organization to which he belonged, he was regarded by his associates as an efficient working member. He belonged to the Grand Army of the Republic, and in May, 1897, was elected Junior Vice Commander of Illinois. He was Colonel on the staff of General-in-Chief Thomas G. Lawler, receiving the appointment November, 1894. He was a member of the Board of Supervisors of Knox County at the time of his death, and by them, resolutions of respect and condolence were passed.

In his religious belief, Mr. Bunker was a Congregationalist. In his political faith, he was a republican, and labored earnestly for the cause of that party.

He was married, May 31, 1873, to Mary Isabell Carpenter, daughter of Asaph N. and Mary E. (Winterbottom) Carpenter. Along the paternal line of her ancestors, is found Thomas Carpenter, her great-grandfather, who was born in Massachusetts. Her great-grandmother was Cloa Carpenter, born in the same State. Her grandfather was Asaph Carpenter, born at Rehoboth MA, and her grandmother was Caroline Carpenter, born in the same town.

Her material line of ancestors reaches back to her great-grandfather, Peter Carpenter, and to her great-grandmother, Nancy Carpenter, both born in Massachusetts. Her grandfather was Lease Winterbottom, a native of England and her grandmother was Sarah Lewis, born in Connecticut.

Mr. and Mrs. Bunker had but one child, Dwight Carpenter, who married Vina Penn. They have one child, Carrie Isabell.


Obituary.  [Contributed by c Foster.]

Peter X. BURKETT - One of the oldest residents of this part of the county, died on Monday evening, February 10, 1919, at his home in Shirleysburg, Huntingdon County, Pa., after a protracted illness due to heart disease and complications appertaining to advanced age.  Mr. Burkett was a native of Sinking Valley, this county, having been born March 18, 1834.  When about eighteen years of age, he moved to Orbisonia.  He was twice married, the first union being with Miss Matilda Hoover, June 27, 1854, and to them nine children were born, of which number six are living.  They are, Mrs. Ella Shearer, of Orbisonia; William Burkett, of Abingdon, Ill.; Mrs. D. N. Kyper, of Huntingdon; Mrs. S. S. Lutz, of Galesburg, Ill.; Mrs. Emma Thompson, of Chicago, Ill.; Mrs. Bruce Gilliland, of Kalispell, Montana; and Mrs. J. A. Lansberry, of Newcomerstown, Ohio.  Harry, Flora and Lawrence are deceased.  Mrs. Burkett died in August, 1903.  Mr. Burkett was married the second time to Mrs. Rettie Jeffries, June 12th, 1906, who survives him, as do also one brother, David Burkett, of Clearfield, two sisters Mrs. K. J. Anderson, of California and Mrs. M. Lightner, of Shirleysburg.  He kept hotel in Shirleysburg for many years, and during that time ran a livery and hack as well as farmed to some extent.  "Burkett's Hack" became household words around this section in the past years.  He was a soldier, a member of the 19th Pennsylvania Cavalry, and has been active in the G. A. R.  Mr. Burkett united some years ago with the Presbyterian church.  The funeral took place from his late residence this (Thursday) morning at 10:30 o'clock and was conducted by Rev. George H. Swayne of the Church of the Brethren.  The G. A. R. participated in the ceremonies giving the deceased the military honors due him for faithful service in his country 's cause  Interment was made in the Presbyterian cemetery south of Shirleysburg.  W. P. Dunmire was the funeral director.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

burkhalter_james.jpg (25676 bytes)JAMES L. BURKHALTER, County Treasurer, is the son of David and Mary A. (Marks) Burkhalter, of Pennsylvania; was born in Lehigh Co., Pa., April 15, 1835.  Educated in common schools and academy, and reared on a farm.  He learned the carpenter trade and commenced the building business in 1852 and has followed it since; came to Knox county in April, 1856.  Was married to Martha E. Adle Nov. 2, 1858 [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a James L. Burkhalter marrying a Martha E. Adle in Knox County on December 2, 1858], who has borne him eight children, six living.  In 1862 he recruited a company for the Union Army; commenced July 23, completed Aug 10; was chosen Captain and kept recruiting until he raised nearly two companies.  His was the first recruiting commission obtained by a Knox county man.  He was often detailed in various staff positions, much of the time in charge of sappers and miners.  During his last year he served as Assistant Adjutant General, and always received favorable mention in Gen. Buell's reports; for meritorious services at Beatonsville, North Carolina, was promoted to Major; was with Sherman on his march to the sea.  He is a Republican, and was elected Treasurer of Knox county in 1875, and re-elected in 1877.  Residence, Maquon.

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From the 1886 Portrait and Biographical Album of Knox County, Biographical Publishing Company, Chicago, page 711.  [Contributed by Micky Dawson.]

Capt. James L. Burkhalter, President of the Farmer's Bank of Galesburg, and Treasurer of Knox County, is the son of David and Marion (Marks) Burkhalter.  He was born in Allentown, Pa., April 15, 1835, and was the eldest in a family of seven sons and four daughters.  His parents were of German descent and in their home spoke only the language of their ancestry, so their children learned no English until they were old enough to attend school.  The names of the brothers and sisters were  Henry P., Savina, David F., Susan E., William, Mary A., Wayne, John, Anna E., and Charles M.  Henry P and Wayne are deceased; Susan E. became the wife of William Smythe and they have one son - William B.; William married Miss Clara Beard, and they are the parents of three children; John married Miss Anna Carkhuff.  The balance of the children reside on the old homestead.

James L. Burkhalter was educated at the Saegerstown Academy, taught school a short time and studied law with a view to professional life.  From some cause, however, he abandoned this idea and went to Meadville, Pa., and there worked at the carpenter's trade until he was 21 years of age.  He landed at Galesburg in April, 1856, where he prosecuted his trade until the outbreak of the Civil War.  After visiting various places he settled down at Maquon, and July 18, 1862, he received a commission from Gov. Yates, authorizing him to raise a company of volunteers.  As recruiting officer, he raised Co. F, for the 86th Ill. Vol. Inf. and Co. G for the 83rd Ill. Vol. Inf.  In camp at Peoria, Aug. 27, 1862, he was placed in command of Co. F, 86th Reg., and served his country faithfully and well until June, 1865.  He was on the staff of Gen. Dan. McCook at the time that officer was killed, and was subsequently on the staffs of Gens. Davis and Morgan, discharging in the meantime the various duties of Provost Marshal, Adjutant-General, Inspector-General, etc.  During his whole connection with the army he was never absent from the post of duty.  At the siege of Atlanta, while on the staff of Gen. Morgan, and acting as one of the topographical engineers, he was captured by a guerrilla, but his Orderly, observing the situation, rushed upon the "reb" with a force that changed his victory into defeat, and in less than two minutes the whilom captor was being led captive into the lines of the Union Army.  While acting as staff officer on the staff of Gen. Morgan, at Bentonville, N.C., the Captain, while carrying dispatches, was compelled to cross a swamp, wading in water up to his waist, under the fire of both armies, and, strange to say, he almost miraculously escaped unharmed. 

Captain Burkhalter left the army with the commission of Major, but, failing to muster as such, he feels that he is scarcely entitled to that rank.  At the close of the war he returned to Maquon, where he was for several years engaged in the lumber business, carrying on in the meantime the work of contractor and builder, and accumulating from various sources quite a sum of money.  He became a stockholder and Director in the Farmers' and Mechanics' Bank in 1882, and in January following was chosen President of that concern.  While a citizen of Maquon he held the office of Police Magistrate for 16 years.  He was elected Treasurer of Knox County in 1875, and re-elected in 1877, 1879 and in 1882.  He has long been recognized as an able Republican worker, and has represented that party as a member of the County Central Committee for 12 years.  He moved into Galesburg in 1884, where he has since resided. 

Capt. Burkhalter is a member of the I. O. O. F. and A. F.& A. M., Eminent Commander of Galesburg Commandery, No. 8, and member of Peoria Consistory.  He was married at Maquon, Dec. 2, 1858, to Martha E. Adle [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a James L. Burkhalter marrying a Martha E. Adle in Knox County on December 2, 1858], native of Genesee County, N.Y., and of German descent.  Mr. and Mrs. Burkhalter have become the parents of eight children, namely:  Charles F., Henry L., James, Dessie, John, Nellie, Robert and Alvin P.  Charles F. married Miss Osa Hoffman, daughter of James D. and Sarah Hoffman.  They have one child, named James.

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From the 1899 Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and Knox County, Munsell Publishing Company, page 711.  [Contributed by Micky Dawson.]

Captain James L. Burkhalter, son of David and Mary Ann (Marks) Burkhalter, was born in Allentown, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, April 15, 1835.

The Burkhalters are Swiss and came originally from the Canton of Berne.  The name, which signifies "Keeper of the Castle," is very common in Switzerland.  Ulrich Burkhalter came to this country in 1732, and on August 11, took the oath of allegiance in William Penn's Colony.  He purchased three hundred acres of land in Burks County (now Lehigh), in Whitehall Township, just north of Allentown.  It was here that the father of Captain Burkhalter was born.

Ulrich had a son Peter, who was Captain Burkhalter's great-great-grandfather, and who possessed the landed estate of his father.  He was a man of prominence.  He was naturalized in 1761; was County Commissioner in 1776; was a member of the State Convention the same year; was a member of the Pennsylvania Assembly for several terms; and was a representative in Congress from 1791 to 1794.  He was also a Captain of a company of the Northampton Association, and saw active service during the Revolution in the Jerseys.  Peter Burkhalter died in 1806.  He had a son whose name was John Peter, and the latter had a son whose name was Henry, the grandfather of James L.  Henry was the father of fourteen children, twelve of whom lived to maturity - six sons and six daughters.  The third son, David, was the father of Captain Burkhalter.

Captain Burkhalter’s life is full of incident and interest.  Both his patriotism and his manhood have made him a man of mark.  The "War Governor," Richard Yates, appointed him recruiting officer under the call of President Lincoln for 300,000 volunteers.  He recruited Company "G" of the Eighty-third and Company "F" of the Eighty-sixth Illinois Volunteers.  He then enlisted as a private in Company "F" and was elected Captain.

Under this rank, he commanded his company through its many campaigns.  He was detailed various other duties, such as building bridges and roads.  As Provost Marshal and later as Inspector General by appointment of General George H. Thomas, he served on staff duty under Generals McCook, Fearing, Morgan, Davis, and Slocum.  He campaigned in very many different States - Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Georgia, Alabama, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia - and was one of "Sherman’s' Bummer's" in that famous march through Georgia to the Sea.  At the close of the war, he took part in the grand review of the Army at Washington.

Alongside the Captains military record, his civil record is worthy of mention.  He has held various public offices, such as Police Magistrate and Town Clerk in Maquon, County Treasurer of Knox County for eleven consecutive years, and Supervisor from the City of Galesburg for five terms.  In January, 1883, he was elected president of the Farmer's and Mechanics' Bank, which position he still holds.

His political creed is republican.  He is strictly a party man.  He is an uncompromising believer in republican principles, and he follows them to the end.  His religious creed is broad, and his impulses are benevolent.   He is a believer in the righteousness of good works.

Captain Burkhalter was married to Martha E. Adle, Dec. 2, 1858 [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a James L. Burkhalter marrying a Martha E. Adle in Knox County on December 2, 1858].  To them were born eight children:  Charles F., Henry L., James W., Desdemona, John D., Nellie L., Robert P., and Alvin P.

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See also the Diary of Captain James L. Burkhalter, Co. F, 86th Illinois Volunteer Infantry.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

GEORGE W. BURNAUGH.  A carpenter and farmer, he was born 28 Oct 1830 in Clermont County, Ohio, and is the son of Joseph and Lydia (Black) Burnaugh, both from the eastern states.  He passed his early life on a farm, and his educational facilities were confined to the common schools.  He served an apprenticeship of four years at the carpenters trade and worked at it five years until his health failed. He then changed to farming in 1855.  He came from Ohio to Illinois in 1844 and has lived in Knox County since 1856.  He married Rebecca Cramer on 8 March 1855.  They have one daughter who is married and living in Orange Twp.  He is a Republican and a member of the M. E. Church. he as been a Trustee of Orange Twp.  Post Office, Knoxville.


Taken from the 1902 Illustrated History of Union and Wallowa Counties, Oregon, pages 372-373.  [Contributed by Todd Walter.]

SAMUEL BURNAUGH.- A well known and representative pioneer and loyal citizen of Union county is named at the head of this article, and we are assured that any compilation that has to do with the history of the county should not fail to give mention of his career since he has labored on the frontier for many years and has accomplished a good success, ever maintaining an attitude of faithfulness, and being active for the advancement of the county, while he has gained an enviable success in the enterprises of private business that he has pursued that has given him a goodly holding of property in the county, being also a leading citizen and prominent man at the present time.

Samuel L. was born in Clermont county, Ohio, on January 12, 1844, being the son of Joseph and Lydia Black, who removed from that locality to Illinois in 1845, being occupied with farming in Knox county until 1859 when they removed to Iowa, settling in Wapello county.  There also they became tillers of the soil but in Knox county, Illinois, on December 8, 1859, the mother was called to leave the scenes of this life and go to the world beyond.  The father remained in Iowa until the time of his death in 1877, being buried there.  Our subject remained with his father until 1864, then came overland with ox teams to Union County, stopping in the vicinity of the Cove, whence in the following spring he went to Eagle creek and followed mining for a few months, then repaired to Walla Walla and there for one and one-half of years he was employed in a sawmill.  Following this period he went to Grant county, where he mined until 1872, then went back to Iowa to visit his father, returning to Union County in six months from that time.  Here he took up freighting until 1875, then rented a farm near the Cove, and in August 1876, bought a half-section where he now lives, from the state.  His estate is situated two and one-half miles southeast from Elgin and is now six hundred and eighty acres.

On October 6, 1875, Mr Burnaugh married Miss Susan E. Jasper, daughter of Merrill Jasper, of the Cove.  Five children were born of this union, Samuel, Dora F., Joseph M., Andrew J. and George, deceased and buried in the Summerville cemetery.  Mrs. Burnaugh was called from her family by death on September 10, 1885 and her remains sleep in the Summerville cemetery.  She was twenty-seven years of age at the time of her death.  Her parents came to Oregon in the early day, living first in the Williamette valley, whence they removed to this county.

Mr. Burnaugh married a second time on November 7, 1894, in Union county, the lady of his choice at this occasion being Mary S. Patten, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Young) Patten, and one child has been born to them, Nellie E.  Mrs. Burnaugh's parents were married in Oregon City, being early pioneers to this state and coming to Union county in 1863.  Mr. Burnaugh is a  member of the Elgin Lodge No. 73. K.P.  He is an esteemed citizen of this county and has maintained an unsullied reputation during all of his worthy labors.


From the 1883 History of the State of Kansas by William G. Cutler.  [Contributed by Todd Walter.]

J. G. BURNER, farmer and stock-raiser, Section 33, P. O. El Dorado, is a native of Illinois, and was born in Knox County, October 25, 1840.  He was educated and reared in that State, coming to Kansas in the spring of 1871.  He has since been identified with the stock interests of Butler County.  He was married in Knox County, Ill., to Miss Martha J. Shaver, March 24, 1864.  They have six children - Alta H., Frank B., Katie G., Oscar G., Judge D. and Ovid B.


From the 1899 Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and Knox County, Munsell Publishing Company, page 917.  [Contributed by Pat Thomas.]

Milton D. Burner; Farmer; Cedar Township, where he was born January 30, 1844; educated in the common schools.  His father, Daniel Green Burner was born in Kentucky, July 7, 1814, and came to Knox County in 1830 with his father, Isaac Burner, who died near Knoxville July 7, 1860.  Daniel G. Burner was a firm friend of Abraham Lincoln, being a clerk in his store at New Salem, Illinois.  After coming to Knox County he worked for a limited time at the carpenter's trade, and assisted in building the first court house at Knoxville.  Later he began farming, and still resides on his farm near Knoxville.  June 24, 1838, he was married to Melissa, daughter of John B. and Casander (Dills) Gumm; five children were born to them: John G, a farmer living near Eldorado, Kansas; Casander, who was the wife of Clate Swigert, and died February 6, 1892; Susan, wife of Oliver Custer, a resident of Cedar township; and Jane, wife of Robert Mount of Des Moines, Iowa.  Mrs. Burner died June 9, 1853.  March 28, 1854, Mr. Burner married Elizabeth Martz, who died February 27, 1877 [probably 1867].  By this union there were three children, Mary, Ellen and Ida, all deceased.  In August 1868, Mr. Burner was married to Susanna C., daughter of John and Rebecca (Lightner) Burns.  Eleven children were born to them: Edwin G., who married Addie Graham of Cuba, Illinois, June 17, 1897, and is a hardware merchant of Chillicothe, Illinois; Willis J., a graduate of Hedding College, now a preacher at Irvington, Indiana, married Lulu Burr of LaHarpe, Illinois, and has two children; Margaret and Jarvis; James A., City Marshal of Chillicothe; Henry L., an employee of the Abingdon Steam Laundry; Melissa R., a teacher in the public schools at Abingdon; Georgia, who resides at Knoxville with her aged grandfather; Etta M.; Bertha J.; Jessie A.; Mina E.; and Francis A., who lives with her parents.  Mr. Burner and family worship at the Christian Church, Abingdon.  In politics, he is a democrat.  He takes especial interest in public affairs, and has held the office of School Trustee for twenty years.


From the 1886 Portrait and Biographical Album of Knox County, Biographical Publishing Company, Chicago, page 972.  [Contributed by Todd Walter.]

G. P. BURNETT is a farmer and stock-raiser on section 30, Haw Creek Township.  He was born in Putnam County, Ind., April 11, 1834, and is the son of Joshua and Elizabeth (Housh) Burnett, natives of Georgia, who emigrated from Indiana to Knox County, Ill., in 1836, coming overland with a team of oxen.  The subject of this sketch was married to Sarah Conser, Sept. 27, 1855 [the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index lists a George Burnett marrying a Sarah Conser in Knox County on September 27, 1855].  She is the daughter of George and Catherine Conser; she was born March 5, 1827.  To this union there were born five children: Mary E., June 13, 1856, is the wife of L. P. Darnell, living in this township; Joshua F., born July 28, 1857, is married to Rosa A. Allen, and lives in this township; Ella A., born Feb. 4, 1859, is the wife of William E. Housh, living in this township; Sarah A., born Nov. 17, 1861; Flora B., June 24, 1864, and they are raising a boy named James A. Nevett [probably Nevitt], born April 1, 1872.  Mr. Burnett makes the breeding and raising of Short-horn Durham cattle a specialty, also fine horses and stock of all kinds.  He has traveled over the Southern and Western States, and has been shipping stock for a number of years, mostly to Western States.  He owns 500 acres of good land, all under fence, and the most of it improved, with good buildings of all kinds and everything in flourishing condition.

Mr. Burnett has been a successful hunter of all kinds of game that infested the Illinois prairies, and is the owner of the celebrated English foxhounds, the only dogs that can, unaided, capture and kill a wolf.  He has a rifle carried by his grandfather, Joshua Burnett, through the Wars of the Revolution and of 1812 and the Black Hawk War, and the old piece is now in good condition, all the changes made being that the old flint lock is modernized by the percussion cap, and the stock, formerly six feet in length, has been cut off to the length of guns of the present day.


From the 1890 Peoria County, Illinois, Portrait and Biographical Album.  [Contributed by Todd Walter.]

Rev. William R. Butcher.  To all believing in the immortality of the soul, the calling of a minister is looked upon as one of the utmost responsibility, requiring the exercise of the highest faculties of which mind and heart are capable, and needing for its successful prosecution the tack which will make a man “wise as a serpent and harmless as a dove.”  Although there have been worthy men who have won many souls to Christ by means only of their religious zeal and natural aptitude for the presentation of Gospel truths, it is generally conceded that a thorough education is a weapon that should be used in the Gospel warfare.  The man who combines with an earnest faith the knowledge of literature which will enable him to cull illustrations from many climes and seasons, and to connect revelation with nature and science, possesses a lever with which to move some hearts which might otherwise remain untouched.

The subject of this sketch, a well-known minister of Elmwood, was prepared in excellent schools, to carry on the work to which his natural inclinations and abiding interest in the cause of Christianity led him.  He is of English birth, having opened his eyes to the light September 25, 1841, in a town in the mother country.  His parents, William and Sophia A. (Chapell) Butcher, likewise natives of England, immigrated to America in 1847, coming directly to Illinois.  They settled in McLean County, but in 1851 removed to Knox County where they are still living.  The aged couple are the parents seven children, three of whom have been spared to the present time.  Of these, the subject of our notice is the oldest.  These are L. G. a resident of Cass County, Iowa and W. J. whose home is in Galesburg, this state.

After some fundamental instruction, he of whom we write entered Knox Academy at Galesburg, whence he at length departed to Montreal, Canada to become a student in McGill University.  He left the University at the close of his junior year and spent some months in England.  Returning to Illinois he engaged in farming, with the variety of school teaching during two winters, until a change in his life plans directed him toward the Christian ministry and he entered the Chicago Theological Seminary, from which he was graduated in 1869.  The American Home Missionary society desired to send ministers to the Far West and was looking about for such as possessed the necessary qualifications to carry on the work in a new field.  While yet in the Theological Seminary, Mr. Butcher was selected as one fitted for such a position.  He was ordained in Galesburg, IL June 15, 1869, and went west the following August.

For seven years Mr. Butcher remained on the Pacific slope, during that time being pastor of a congregational Church at Albany, Oregon, and subsequently of one at The Dalles.  He put the whole strength of his mind and body into his work and was abundantly blest by the love and confidence of his people and by the increase of the religious bodies under his charge.  He returned to Illinois in 1876 and in this State has since remained with the exception of two and one-half years, still laboring in the Master's vineyard and garnering sheaves for his kingdom.  He has been stationed at Hisdale, Wataga and Elmwood, his charge in the latter lace having been assumed some three years since.  Kokomo, Indiana was the field of his labors during the period which he has passed outside of Illinois since his return from the West.

The Congregational Church at Elmwood, over which our subject has pastoral are and oversight, has been in existence since 1854.  The congregation numbers about two hundred, carries on a great deal of benevolent work, and is an important factor in the moral education of the young as well as the spiritual welfare of those that are old enough to decide the great question, "whom will ye serve."

Mr. Butcher is an able speaker, not only on Bible topics, which he eloquently expounds, but on other subjects of both social and national import.  He frequently delivers orations on Decoration Day and the fourth of July, the announcement that he is to speak never failing to attract many listeners.  He is well known as a strong advocate of Temperance, although not a third party man, his political affiliation being with the Republican party.  His first Presidential vote was cast for Abraham Lincoln at this second candidacy.  Thoroughly posted on various political issues, Mr. Butcher has not only weighed well and calmly decided upon their merits, but he is able to clearly express his convictions to others.

The household of our subject includes a wife and five children, the most important member of the circle being a devoted Christian woman who bore the maiden of Mary Avery.  She became the wife our subject in 1869 [April 30, 1869 in Knox County], and by her appreciation of his efforts and entire sympathy with his aspirations, as well as by the peace which she has secured to his home life, has been an efficient aid to him in the work which he has undertaken.  Her parents, George and S. P. M. (Phelps) Avery, were members of the first colony in Galesburg, where the daughter was born August 13, 1844.  She was a student at Knox Seminary and has ever been much interested in the prosperity of her Alma Mater, as are all lovers of learning.  Her father was a native of New York and her mother of Massachusetts.

The children of Mr. And Mrs. Butcher are: Harry E., Mary Zelle, Etha, William A., and Irene Louise.  The older son has just entered Knox College and the others are students still in the common and high schools.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

JAMES W. BUTLER.  He has for many years been prominently before the public as an educator and preacher of the Gospel of the Christian Church.  He was born in Warren county, KY, on 2 Oct 1826, the son of Peter Butler who moved to Warren Co IL in 1829, hence was among the earliest settlers in this part of the State.  In 1853, he removed to Polk County, Oregon, where he died in 1856.  His mother was Rachel (Murphy) Butler of Kentucky.  The first school attended by Mr. B. was taught in a log schoolhouse in Warren County, IL.  His first teacher was Alexander Reynolds, a preacher; subsequently, he received training of that successful teacher, officer and farmer, Howell Haskell.  In 1845, he entered Knox Academy, Galesburg, and after two years entered Knox College.  In 1847, he entered Bethany College, Bethany, VA, where he graduated in 1850, and soon entered upon the ministry.  It was under the preaching of Alexander Campbell while at Bethany that he made a profession of religion and was immersed by W. K. Pendleton, the present President of Bethany.  Among his classmates were J. B. New, late Treasurer of United States, and J. W. McGarvy, Professor in KY University.  On 1 July 1851, he was married to Mary E. Ground, daughter of Henry Ground, who resides two miles west of Abingdon.  Mrs. B. has even been a faithful and devoted wife.  In 1853, he was elected Treasurer of Warren County which position he held until he was called to the chair of Mathematics in Abingdon College in 1855.  He was President of that college for fourteen years.  In 1867, he was called to the Presidency of Christian College, Monmouth, Oregon.  In August 1867, he and his family sailed from NY City for California, whence after a short visit they went to Oregon.  On 2 Feb 1868, they started home again by rail.  At Rowling Springs, a heavy snow storm was encountered which stopped the train and cut off all communications either way.  The snow filled the cuts to the depth of 25 feet.  After three weeks delay and in great danger they proceeded on their way.  In 1874, he was called to the Presidency of Christian College, Santa Rosa, CA, where he stayed for one year and where he was also Pastor of the Christian Church.  He has but one child living.  His son, Seldon H., is a graduate of Abingdon College, also of the Law Department of the Northwestern University, Chicago.


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

CHARLES NORRIS BUTT.  A farmer, he was born in Champaign County, Ohio on Mar 10, 1883, the son of Thomas D. and Sarah (Williams) Butt, of Greenbriar County, West Virginia.  His parents came to Knox County, IL in 1837.  He was educated in the district schools of Persifer Twp. he still lives on the old farm six miles east of Knoxville, where his parents settled forty-one years ago.  He filled the office of Road Commissioner in Knox Twp, in the years of 1875-6-7.  On Dec. 31, 1857, he married Sarah S. Montgomery, who has borne him one child, a son.  He is a Republican.  Post Office, Knoxville.

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From the 1899 Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and Knox County, Munsell Publishing Company.  [Contributed by Todd Walter.]

CHARLES N. BUTT; farmer, Knox Township; born in Champaign County, Ohio, March 10, 1833; educated in one of the log school houses of Knox County.  His parents, Thomas D. and Sarah (Williams) Butt, were born in Greenbriar County, West Virginia.  His paternal grandparents, Archibald and Sarah (Norris) Butt, and his maternal grandparents, John and Martha (Knight) Williams were natives of Virginia.  Archibald Butt was a Drum Major in the War of 1812, and while on a retreat was wounded in the shoulder by a shot through his drum.  December 31, 1857, Mr. Butt was married to Sarah S. Montgomery in Knox County.  The have one child, Harvey J. who is cashier in the Farmers' National Bank of Knoxville.  Harvey J. was married to Sarah McCracken.  They have one daughter, Dorris.  Mr. Butt's brother, George W., and several of his cousins were soldiers in the War of the Rebellion.  In religion, Mr. Butt is a nominal Protestant.  In politics, he is a Democrat.


From the 1886 Portrait and Biographical Album of Knox County, Biographical Publishing Company, Chicago, page 300.  [Contributed by Todd Walter.]

GEORGE W. BUTT.  Among the principal farmers, whose names are enrolled on the records of Knox County as worth of mention for success and enterprise, is found the subject, who for zeal and thrift has no superior in this section of the country.  His home is situated on section 29, and is a desirable and attractive farm, the soil being under high cultivation and including 355 aces of land, 150 of which is tillable.  Mr. Butt came with his parents to this part of the State in infancy, being but 13 months old, from Champaign County, Ohio, where he was born, Feb. 16, 1836.  His parents, Thomas E. and Sarah E. (Williams) Butt, were natives of Virginia and settled in Persifer Township, where they both died.

They had 13 children, of whom William was the 12th in order of birth.  He was given some educational advantages, receiving a common-school education, and has been engaged in agricultural pursuits for some length of time.  He was married in Persifer Township, Sept. 11, 1853, to Dorcas Dawson, daughter of James and Margaret (Claypool) Dawson, natives of Ohio.  Mrs. Butt was born in what is now known as Vinton County, Ohio, July 8, 1834.  Mr. and Mrs. Butt have seven living children, as follows: Martha J., James A., Thomas J., Harriet Anna, Charles I., Sarah E., and George W., Jr.  The have buried one child, John W. by name.  Martha is the wife of L. N. Hiler, and resides in Knoxville; she has one child, by name George E.; James A. is in Washington Territory; Thomas is married to Sarah H. Jackson and his home is in Persifer Township; they have three children - Lawrence, Benjamin L. and Laurel; Harriet Anna is the wife of James H. Perkins, and her home is in Persifer Township; she is the mother of two children - Katie M. and Charley R.  The remaining children are all under the parental roof.

Mr. Butt has been Road Commissioner, Township Clerk and School Director respectively, which offices he has held with honor and credit to himself and his electors.  He was given the position of Justice of the Peace, but did not qualify for it.  He has served his country faithfully and well, fighting under the stars and stripes to protect her, and to win that noble independence and liberty which are birthrights of every American and which they will suffer nothing to wrest from them.  He enlisted Dec. 21, 1861, in Co. B. 1st Ill. Cav., and served seven months, when he was honorably discharged, and re-enlisted in Co A, 10th Missouri Cav.  In that regiment he served for three years, and when at last discharged he returned to his home in Persifer Township.  He is at the present time a member of the James T. Shields Post, No. 45, G.A.R." 


From the 1878 History of Knox County, Illinois published by Charles C. Chapman.  [Contributed by Joan Achille.]

NELSON B. BYRAM.  He is the son of Joseph and Abigail L. (Harris) Byram, natives of New Jersey, and Nelson B. was born in Dayton, Ohio on 4 April 1818.  He was educated in the common schools in Indiana and reared on the farm.  He learned the blacksmith trade with he changed to farming.  He was married 14 Dec 1847 to Rebecca Jane Hamilton, who has borne him three children.  He united with the M. E. Church in 1857 and has been Collector, Town Clerk and Justice of the Peace.  He is Republican in politics.  Post Office, Knoxville.